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The productivity-wage premium: Does size still matter in a service economy?

Author

Listed:
  • Giuseppe Berlingieri

    (OECD)

  • Sara Calligaris

    (OECD)

  • Chiara Criscuolo

    (OECD)

Abstract

The literature has established two robust stylised facts: (i) the existence of a firm size-wage premium; and (ii) a positive relationship between firm size and productivity. However, the existing evidence is mainly based on manufacturing data only. With manufacturing nowadays accounting for a small share of the economy, whether productivity, size, and wages are closely linked, and how tight this link is across sectors, is still an open question. Using a unique micro-aggregated dataset covering the whole economy in 17 countries over 1994-2012, this paper compares these relationships across sectors. While the size-wage and size-productivity premia are significantly weaker in market services compared to manufacturing, the link between wages and productivity is stronger. The combination of these results suggests that, in a service economy the “size-wage premium” becomes more a “productivity-wage premium”. These results have first-order policy implications for both workers and firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Giuseppe Berlingieri & Sara Calligaris & Chiara Criscuolo, 2018. "The productivity-wage premium: Does size still matter in a service economy?," OECD Science, Technology and Industry Working Papers 2018/13, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:stiaaa:2018/13-en
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/04e36c29-en
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Productivity; Size-Premium; Wages;

    JEL classification:

    • D2 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations
    • E2 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment
    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs

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