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Credit supply and demand in unconventional times

Author

Listed:
  • Altavilla, Carlo
  • Boucinha, Miguel
  • Holton, Sarah
  • Ongena, Steven

Abstract

Do borrowers demand less credit from banks with weak balance sheet positions? To answer this question we use novel bank-specific survey data matched with confidential balance sheet information on a large set of euro area banks. We find that, following a conventional monetary policy shock, bank balance sheet strength influences not only credit supply but also credit demand. The resilience of lenders plays an important role for firms when selecting whom to borrow from. We also assess the impact on credit origination of unconventional monetary policies using survey responses on the exposure of individual banks to quantitative easing and negative interest rate policies. We find that both policies do stimulate loan supply even after fully controlling for bank-specific demand, borrower quality, and balance sheet strength. JEL Classification: E51, G21

Suggested Citation

  • Altavilla, Carlo & Boucinha, Miguel & Holton, Sarah & Ongena, Steven, 2018. "Credit supply and demand in unconventional times," Working Paper Series 2202, European Central Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecb:ecbwps:20182202
    Note: 2279334
    as

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    File URL: https://www.ecb.europa.eu//pub/pdf/scpwps/ecb.wp2202.en.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Altavilla, Carlo & Burlon, Lorenzo & Giannetti, Mariassunta & Holton, Sarah, 2019. "Is there a zero lower bound? The effects of negative policy rates on banks and firms," Working Paper Series 2289, European Central Bank.
    2. Blaes, Barno A. & Kraaz, Björn & Offermanns, Christian J., 2019. "The effects of the eurosystem's APP on euro area bank lending: Letting different data speak," Discussion Papers 26/2019, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    3. Altavilla, Carlo & C. Andreeva, Desislava & Boucinha, Miguel & Holton, Sarah, 2019. "Monetary policy, credit institutions and the bank lending channel in the euro area," Occasional Paper Series 222, European Central Bank.
    4. Desislava C. Andreeva & Miguel García-Posada, 2019. "The impact of the ECB’s targeted long-term refinancing operations on banks’ lending policies: the role of competition," Working Papers 1903, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    balance sheet strength; bank lending survey; credit demand and supply; non-standard monetary policy;

    JEL classification:

    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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