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How Shocks Affect International Reserves? A Quasi-Experiment of Earthquakes

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  • Yothin Jinjarak
  • Ilan Noy
  • Quy Ta

Abstract

We evaluate the change in international reserves in the aftermath of significant external shocks. We examine the response of international reserves to shocks by using a quasi-experimental setup and focusing on earthquakes. The estimation is done on a panel of 103 countries over the period 1979–2016. We find that in the five years following a large earthquake (i) countries exposed accumulate reserves, for precautionary reasons, (ii) trade openness is positively associated with the post-earthquake reserves accumulation, (iii) episodes of reserves depletion are observed in countries under the fixed exchange rate and/or inflation targeting regimes, and (iv) the patterns of reserves holding post-earthquake vary with a country’s income level.

Suggested Citation

  • Yothin Jinjarak & Ilan Noy & Quy Ta, 2020. "How Shocks Affect International Reserves? A Quasi-Experiment of Earthquakes," CESifo Working Paper Series 8632, CESifo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_8632
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    Keywords

    disasters; earthquakes; international reserves; foreign exchange holding;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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