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Evolving international inflation dynamics: evidence from a time-varying dynamic factor model

  • Haroon Mumtaz
  • Paolo Surico

Several industrialised countries have had a similar inflation experience in the past 30 years, with inflation high and volatile in the 1970s and the 1980s but low and stable in the most recent period. We explore the dynamics of inflation in these countries via a time-varying factor model. This statistical model is used to describe movements in inflation that are idiosyncratic or country specific and those that are common across countries. In addition, we investigate how comovement has varied across the sample period. Our results indicate that there has been a decline in the level, persistence and volatility of inflation across our sample of industrialised countries. In addition, there has been a change in the degree of comovement, with the level and persistence of national inflation rates moving more closely together since the mid-1980s.

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Paper provided by Bank of England in its series Bank of England working papers with number 341.

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Date of creation: Feb 2008
Handle: RePEc:boe:boeewp:341
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