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How Food Away From Home Affects Children's Diet Quality

Author

Listed:
  • Mancino, Lisa
  • Todd, Jessica E.
  • Guthrie, Joanne F.
  • Lin, Biing-Hwan

Abstract

Based on 2 days of dietary data and panel data methods, this study includes estimates of how each child’s consumption of food away from home, food from school (which includes all foods available for purchase at schools, not only those offered as part of USDA reimbursable meals), and caloric sweetened beverages affects that child’s diet quality and calorie consumption. Compared with meals and snacks prepared at home, food prepared away from home increases caloric intake of children, especially older children. Each food-away-from-home meal adds 108 more calories to daily total intake among children ages 13-18 than a snack or meal from home; all food from school is estimated to add 145 more calories. Both food away from home and all food from school also lower the daily diet quality of older children (as measured by the 2005 Healthy Eating Index). Among younger children, who are more likely than older children to eat a USDA school meal and face a more healthful school food environment, the effect of food from school on caloric intake and diet quality does not differ significantly from that of food from home.

Suggested Citation

  • Mancino, Lisa & Todd, Jessica E. & Guthrie, Joanne F. & Lin, Biing-Hwan, 2010. "How Food Away From Home Affects Children's Diet Quality," Economic Research Report 134700, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uersrr:134700
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/134700
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Daniel M. Finkelstein & Elaine Hill & Robert C. Whitaker, 2007. "School Food Environments and Policies in U.S. Public Schools," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 134adc746ce140b3becb9375d, Mathematica Policy Research.
    2. repec:mpr:mprres:5781 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Janet Currie & Stefano DellaVigna & Enrico Moretti & Vikram Pathania, 2010. "The Effect of Fast Food Restaurants on Obesity and Weight Gain," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 2(3), pages 32-63, August.
    4. Todd, Jessica E. & Mancino, Lisa & Lin, Biing-Hwan, 2010. "The Impact of Food Away from Home on Adult Diet Quality," Economic Research Report 58298, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    5. Mancino, Lisa & Todd, Jessica & Lin, Biing-Hwan, 2009. "Separating what we eat from where: Measuring the effect of food away from home on diet quality," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 557-562, December.
    6. Carlson, Andrea & Lino, Mark & Juan, WenYen & Hanson, Kenneth & Basiotis, P. Peter, 2007. "Thrifty Food Plan, 2006," CNPP Reports 42899, United States Department of Agriculture, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion.
    7. Ralston, Katherine L. & Newman, Constance & Clauson, Annette L. & Guthrie, Joanne F. & Buzby, Jean C., 2008. "The National School Lunch Program: Background, Trends, and Issues," Economic Research Report 56464, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    8. repec:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.2005.083782_8 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Newman, Constance & Guthrie, Joanne F. & Mancino, Lisa & Ralston, Katherine L. & Musiker, Melissa, 2009. "Meeting Total Fat Requirements for School Lunches: Influences of School Policies and Characteristics," Economic Research Report 55957, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    10. Hillary L. Burdette & Robert C. Whitaker, "undated". "Neighborhood Playgrounds, Fast Food Restaurants, and Crime: Relationships to Overweight in Low-Income Preschool Children," Mathematica Policy Research Reports bada620ecb814609b03636123, Mathematica Policy Research.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Li, Shuo & McCluskey, Jill J. & Mittelhammer, Ron C., 2012. "Effects of Healthier Choices on Kid's Menu: A Difference-in-Differences Analysis," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 43(3), November.
    2. Smith, Travis A., 2013. ""Billions and Billions Served" Heterogeneous Effects of Food Source on Child Dietary Quality," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 151212, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Rehkamp, Sarah & Canning, Patrick, 2016. "The Effects of American Diets on Food System Energy Use," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235896, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    4. Zeng, Di & Thomsen, Michael R. & Nayga, Rodolfo M. & Rouse, Heather L., 2016. "Middle school transition and body weight outcomes: Evidence from Arkansas Public Schoolchildren," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 21(C), pages 64-74.
    5. Lin, Biing-Hwan & Guthrie, Joanne F., 2012. "Nutritional Quality of Food Prepared at Home and Away From Home, 1977-2008," Economic Information Bulletin 142361, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    6. repec:oup:ajagec:v:99:y:2017:i:2:p:339-356. is not listed on IDEAS

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