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Low-Income Households' Expenditures On Fruits And Vegetables

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  • Blisard, Noel
  • Stewart, Hayden
  • Jolliffe, Dean

Abstract

This report analyzes fruit and vegetable expenditures by low-income households and higher income households, and compares the sensitivity of both groups' purchases to changes in income. On average, low-income households spent $3.59 per capita per week on fruits and vegetables in 2000 while higher income households spent $5.02-a statistically significant difference. In addition, a statistical demand model indicates that marginal increases in income received by low-income households are not spent on additional fruits and vegetables. In contrast, increases in income received by higher income households do increase their fruit and vegetable expenditures. One interpretation of this finding is that low-income households will allocate an additional dollar of income to other food or nonfood items deemed more essential to the household such as meats, clothing, or housing.

Suggested Citation

  • Blisard, Noel & Stewart, Hayden & Jolliffe, Dean, 2004. "Low-Income Households' Expenditures On Fruits And Vegetables," Agricultural Economics Reports 34041, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uerser:34041
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Wilde, Parke E. & McNamara, Paul E. & Ranney, Christine K., 2002. "The Effect On Dietary Quality Of Participation In The Food Stamp And Wic Programs," Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Reports 33837, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    2. Stewart, Hayden & Blisard, Noel & Jolliffe, Dean, 2003. "Do Income Constraints Inhibit Spending on Fruits and Vegetables Among Low-Income Households?," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 28(03), December.
    3. Leibtag, Ephraim S. & Kaufman, Phillip R., 2003. "Exploring Food Purchase Behavior of Low-Income Households: How Do They Economize?," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33711, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    4. Buchinsky, Moshe, 1994. "Changes in the U.S. Wage Structure 1963-1987: Application of Quantile Regression," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 62(2), pages 405-458, March.
    5. Parke E. Wilde & Paul E. McNamara & Christine K. Ranney, 1999. "The Effect of Income and Food Programs on Dietary Quality: A Seemingly Unrelated Regression Analysis with Error Components," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(4), pages 959-971.
    6. Kellie Curry Raper & Maria Namakhoye Wanzala & Rodolfo Nayga, 2002. "Food expenditures and household demographic composition in the US: a demand systems approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(8), pages 981-992.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dallongeville, Jean & Dauchet, Luc & de Mouzon, Olivier & Réquillart, Vincent & Soler, Louis-Georges, 2010. "Are Fruit and Vegetable Stamp Policies Cost Effective?," IDEI Working Papers 648, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse.
    2. Steven T. Yen & Andrew K.G. Tan & Rodolfo M. Nayga Jr, 2011. "Determinants of fruit and vegetable consumption in Malaysia: an ordinal system approach," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 55(2), pages 239-256, April.
    3. Steven Yen & Andrew Tan, 2012. "Who are eating and not eating fruits and vegetables in Malaysia?," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 57(6), pages 945-951, December.
    4. Carroll, Kathryn A. & Samek, Anya Savikhin & Zepeda, Lydia, 2016. "Product Bundling as a Behavioral Nudge: Investigating Consumer Fruit and Vegetable Selection using Dual-Self Theory," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 236130, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Yen, Steven T. & Tan, Andrew K.G., 2011. "Fruit and vegetable consumption in Malaysia: a count system approach," 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland 115969, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    6. Stewart, Hayden & Blisard, Noel, 2008. "Are Lower Income Households Willing and Able To Budget for Fruits and Vegetables?," Economic Research Report 56446, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    7. McFadden, Brandon & Mullally, Conner, 2017. "The Effect of Market Segmentation on Consumer Welfare: The Case of Organic and Conventional Fruits and Vegetables," 2017 Annual Meeting, February 4-7, 2017, Mobile, Alabama 252778, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    8. Klerman, Jacob Alex & Bartlett, Susan & Wilde, Parke & Olsho, Lauren, 2013. "The Healthy Incentives Pilot and Fruit and Vegetable Intake: Interim Results," 2014 Allied Social Science Association (ASSA) Annual Meeting, January 3-5, 2014, Philadelphia, PA 161655, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    9. Alston, Julian M. & Mullally, Conner C. & Sumner, Daniel A. & Townsend, Marilyn & Vosti, Stephen A., 2009. "Likely effects on obesity from proposed changes to the US food stamp program," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 176-184, April.
    10. repec:wsi:serxxx:v:59:y:2014:i:02:n:s0217590814500179 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Chen, Susan E. & Liu, Jing & Binkley, James K., 2012. "An Exploration of the Relationship Between Income and Eating Behavior," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 41(1), April.
    12. Guy E.J. Faulkner & Paul Grootendorst & Van Hai Nguyen & Tatiana Andreyeva & Kelly Arbour-Nicitopoulos & Chris Auld & Sean B. Cash & John Cawley & Peter Donnelly & Adam Drewnowski & Laurette Dubé & Ro, 2011. "Economic Instruments for Obesity Prevention: Results of a Scoping Review and Modified Delphi Survey," Monash Economics Working Papers 31-11, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    13. Schroeter, Christiane & Cai, Xiaowei, 2011. "It’s All About Produce: Flexing the Muscles of Western U.S. Organic Spinach Consumption," Western Economics Forum, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 10(02).
    14. Zhang, Feng & Huang, Chung L. & Lin, Biing-Hwan, 2006. "Modeling Fresh Organic Produce Consumption: A Generalized Double-Hurdle Model Approach," 2006 Annual Meeting, February 5-8, 2006, Orlando, Florida 35435, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    15. Feng Zhang & Chung L. Huang & Biing-Hwan Lin & James E. Epperson, 2008. "Modeling fresh organic produce consumption with scanner data: a generalized double hurdle model approach," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(4), pages 510-522.
    16. Tan, Andrew K. G. & Yen, Steven T. & Hasan, Abdul Rahman & Muhamed, Kamarudin, 2014. "Household Expenditures on Vegetables in Malaysia," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 46(04), November.
    17. Godwin, Sandria L. & Tegegne, Fisseha, 2006. "Lack of Easy Accessibility as a Potential Barrier to Adequate Fruit and Vegetable Consumption by Limited-Resource Individuals," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 37(01), March.
    18. Govindasamy, Ramu & Kumaraswamy, Anicham & Puduri, Venkata S. & Onyango, Benjamin M., 2006. "Demographic Characteristics of Consumers who Read Grocery Brochures Regularly and Those who are willing to Switch Supermarkets to Buy Advertised Specials: An Analysis," P Series 36718, Rutgers University, Department of Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics.

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