IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ags/aaea12/124839.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Effect of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program on Food Spending Among Low-Income Households

Author

Listed:
  • Boonsaeng, Tullaya
  • Carpio, Carlos E.
  • Zhen, Chen
  • Okrent, Abigail M.

Abstract

The main goal of this paper is to provide current information on the impacts of Supplemental Nutrition Assistant Program (SNAP) on food spending across two food subgroups: food at home (FAH) and food away from home (FAFH). Data was obtained from the BLS‟s Consumer Expenditure Survey and Detailed Monthly Consumer Price Indices from years 1998 to 2009. Censoring of expenditures and the endogeneity of the SNAP participation variable are accounted for with the use of specialized econometric procedures. We found that SNAP participation increases FAH by $25 and decreases expenditures on food away from home by $32. Since the average SNAP benefits received by participants in the program is $80, the marginal propensity to consume of food at home out of SNAP benefits is 0.31.

Suggested Citation

  • Boonsaeng, Tullaya & Carpio, Carlos E. & Zhen, Chen & Okrent, Abigail M., 2012. "The Effect of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program on Food Spending Among Low-Income Households," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124839, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea12:124839
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/124839
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Richard Blundell & Jean-Marc Robin, 2000. "Latent Separability: Grouping Goods without Weak Separability," Econometrica, Econometric Society, pages 53-84.
    2. Steven T. Yen & Biing-Hwan Lin, 2006. "A Sample Selection Approach to Censored Demand Systems," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 88(3), pages 742-749.
    3. Arthur Lewbel & Krishna Pendakur, 2009. "Tricks with Hicks: The EASI Demand System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 827-863.
    4. Okrent, Abigail M. & Alston, Julian M., 2011. "Demand for Food in the United States: A Review of Literature, Evaluation of Previous Estimates, and Presentation of New Estimates of Demand," Monographs, University of California, Davis, Giannini Foundation, number 251908.
    5. Elton Mykerezi & Bradford Mills, 2010. "The Impact of Food Stamp Program Participation on Household Food Insecurity," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 92(5), pages 1379-1391.
    6. Kaushal, N., 2007. "Do food stamps cause obesity?: Evidence from immigrant experience," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, pages 968-991.
    7. J. Scott Shonkwiler & Steven T. Yen, 1999. "Two-Step Estimation of a Censored System of Equations," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(4), pages 972-982.
    8. Chavas, Jean-Paul & Yeung, M. L., 1982. "Effects of the Food Stamp Program on Food Consumption in the Southern United States," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, pages 131-139.
    9. Hoderlein, Stefan & Mihaleva, Sonya, 2008. "Increasing the price variation in a repeated cross section," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 147(2), pages 316-325, December.
    10. Craig Gundersen & Victor Oliveira, 2001. "The Food Stamp Program and Food Insufficiency," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(4), pages 875-887.
    11. Okrent, Abigail M. & Alston, Julian M., 2010. "The Demand for Food in the United States: A Review of the Literature, Evaluation of Previous Estimates, and Presentation of New Estimates of Demand," 2010 Annual Meeting, July 25-27, 2010, Denver, Colorado 61674, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    12. Andreas C. Drichoutis & Stathis Klonaris & Panagiotis Lazaridis & Rodolfo M. Nayga, 2008. "Household food consumption in Turkey: a comment," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 35(1), pages 93-98, March.
    13. Carlos E. Carpio & Michael K. Wohlgenant, 2010. "A general two-constraint model of consumer demand," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 37(4), pages 433-452, December.
    14. Stewart, Hayden & Yen, Steven T., 2004. "Changing household characteristics and the away-from-home food market: a censored equation system approach," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 643-658, December.
    15. Chad D. Meyerhoefer & Yuriy Pylypchuk, 2008. "Does Participation in the Food Stamp Program Increase the Prevalence of Obesity and Health Care Spending?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 90(2), pages 287-305.
    16. Kellie Curry Raper & Maria Namakhoye Wanzala & Rodolfo Nayga, 2002. "Food expenditures and household demographic composition in the US: a demand systems approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(8), pages 981-992.
    17. Parke E. Wilde & Lisa M. Troy & Beatrice L. Rogers, 2007. "Food Stamps and Food Spending: An Engel Function Approach," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(2), pages 416-430.
    18. Steven T. Yen & Margaret Andrews & Zhuo Chen & David B. Eastwood, 2008. "Food Stamp Program Participation and Food Insecurity: An Instrumental Variables Approach," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 90(1), pages 117-132.
    19. John L. Park & Rodney B. Holcomb & Kellie Curry Raper & Oral Capps, 1996. "A Demand Systems Analysis of Food Commodities by U.S. Households Segmented by Income," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(2), pages 290-300.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:mpr:mprres:7859 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. James Mabli & Jim Ohls & Lisa Dragoset & Laura Castner & Betsy Santos, 2013. "Measuring the Effect of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) Participation on Food Security," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 69d901432c7a46779666a240a, Mathematica Policy Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Censored Demand; Control Function Approach for Endogeneity; Consumer/Household Economics; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:aaea12:124839. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/aaeaaea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.