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The Impact of Food Stamp Program Participation on Household Food Insecurity

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  • Elton Mykerezi
  • Bradford Mills

Abstract

This study examines the impact that participation in the Food Stamp Program has on household food insecurity using data from the Panel Survey of Income Dynamics. Two strategies are used to identify the causal effect of the program. First, endogenous treatment effect models are estimated using state-level errors in payments of benefits as instruments. Additionally the impact of losing benefits due to a government decision on the food insecurity of program participants is examined. The paper finds that program participation lowers food insecurity by at least 18%. Copyright 2010, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Elton Mykerezi & Bradford Mills, 2010. "The Impact of Food Stamp Program Participation on Household Food Insecurity," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 92(5), pages 1379-1391.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:92:y:2010:i:5:p:1379-1391
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    1. Robert B. Barsky & Miles S. Kimball & F. Thomas Juster & Matthew D. Shapiro, 1995. "Preference Parameters and Behavioral Heterogeneity: An Experimental Approach in the Health and Retirement Survey," NBER Working Papers 5213, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. repec:oup:revage:v:27:y:2005:i:3:p:439-445. is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Nord, Mark, 2005. "Measuring U.S. Household Food Security," Amber Waves, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, April.
    4. Parke Wilde & Mark Nord, 2005. "The Effect of Food Stamps on Food Security: A Panel Data Approach ," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 27(3), pages 425-432.
    5. Huffman, Sonya Kostova & Jensen, Helen H., 2003. "Do Food Assistance Programs Improve Household Food Security?: Recent Evidence From The United States," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22219, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    6. Helen H. Jensen, 2002. "Food Insecurity and the Food Stamp Program," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(5), pages 1215-1228.
    7. Nader S. Kabbani & Myra Yazbeck Kmeid, 2005. "The Role of Food Assistance in Helping Food Insecure Households Escape Hunger," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 27(3), pages 439-445.
    8. Craig Gundersen & Victor Oliveira, 2001. "The Food Stamp Program and Food Insufficiency," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(4), pages 875-887.
    9. Nord, Mark & Andrews, Margaret S. & Carlson, Steven, 2006. "Household Food Security in the United States, 2005," Economic Research Report 7243, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
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