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Food Stamps, Temporary Assistance For Needy Families And Food Hardships In Three American Cities

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Listed:
  • Richard A. DePolt
  • Robert A. Moffitt
  • David C. Ribar

Abstract

We examine how participation in the Food Stamp and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Programs is associated with self-reported household food hardships, using data from a longitudinal survey of low-income families living in Boston, Chicago and San Antonio. In addition to the measures of hardships and program participation, the survey includes measures of income, wealth, social resources, disability, physical health and family structure, measures that help us to account for selection between recipient and non-recipient households. For our multivariate analyses, we estimate multiple indicator multiple cause models that are modified to incorporate discrete outcome variables and to account for longitudinal data. Estimates from these models reveal that participation in the Food Stamp Program is associated with fewer food hardships, while participation in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program has no detectable association with hardships. Copyright 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation 2009 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

Suggested Citation

  • Richard A. DePolt & Robert A. Moffitt & David C. Ribar, 2009. "Food Stamps, Temporary Assistance For Needy Families And Food Hardships In Three American Cities," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(4), pages 445-473, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:pacecr:v:14:y:2009:i:4:p:445-473
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Parke Wilde & Mark Nord, 2005. "The Effect of Food Stamps on Food Security: A Panel Data Approach ," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 27(3), pages 425-432.
    2. Anonymous & Hamilton, William L. & Lin, Biing-Hwan, 2004. "Effects Of Food Assistance And Nutrition Programs On Nutrition And Health: Volume 3, Literature Review," Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Reports 33863, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    3. Borjas, George J., 2004. "Food insecurity and public assistance," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(7-8), pages 1421-1443, July.
    4. Helen H. Jensen, 2002. "Food Insecurity and the Food Stamp Program," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 84(5), pages 1215-1228.
    5. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1999:89:8:1231-1234_8 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Nord, Mark & Andrews, Margaret S. & Carlson, Steven, 2007. "Household Food Security in the United States, 2006," Economic Research Report 55966, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    7. Fox, Mary Kay & Hamilton, William L. & Lin, Biing-Hwan, 2004. "Effects Of Food Assistance And Nutrition Programs On Nutrition And Health: Volume 4, Executive Summary Of The Literature Review," Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Reports 33871, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    8. Craig Gundersen & Victor Oliveira, 2001. "The Food Stamp Program and Food Insufficiency," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(4), pages 875-887.
    9. repec:oup:revage:v:27:y:2005:i:3:p:425-432. is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Chamberlain, Gary, 1982. "Multivariate regression models for panel data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 5-46, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. David C. Ribar & Daniela Zapata, 2017. "Food assistance and family routines in three American Cities," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 223-238, March.
    2. Zhang, Jun & Yen, Steven, 2014. "Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and Food Insecurity among Families with Children," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 167477, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Andrea Sales S. De A. Melo, 2018. "The ?Bolsa-Família? Program And The Food Insecurity In Brazilian Household Between 2009 And 2013," Anais do XLIV Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 44th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 72, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pós-Graduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    4. Gundersen, Craig & Kreider, Brent & Pepper, John, 2012. "The impact of the National School Lunch Program on child health: A nonparametric bounds analysis," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 166(1), pages 79-91.
    5. Partha Deb & Christian A. Gregory, 2016. "Who Benefits Most from SNAP? A Study of Food Security and Food Spending," NBER Working Papers 22977, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Hilary Hoynes & Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach, 2015. "U.S. Food and Nutrition Programs," NBER Chapters,in: Economics of Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States, volume 1, pages 219-301 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Robert A. Moffitt & David C. Ribar, 2016. "Child Age and Gender Differences in Food Security in a Low-Income Inner-City Population," NBER Working Papers 22988, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Gregory, Christian A. & Deb, Partha, 2015. "Does SNAP improve your health?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 11-19.
    9. Zhang, Jun & Yen, Steven T., 2017. "Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and food insecurity among families with children," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 52-64.
    10. Gregory, Christian A. & Ver Ploeg, Michele & Andrews, Margaret S. & Coleman-Jensen, Alisha, 2012. "SNAP and Diet Quality: An Instrumental Variables Approach," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124757, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    11. repec:spr:ssefpa:v:9:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s12571-017-0733-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Gregory, Christian & Deb, Partha, 2016. "Who Benefits Most from SNAP?," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 236648, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    13. Burgstahler, Rebecca & Gundersen, Craig & Garasky, Steven B., 2012. "The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Financial Stress, and Childhood Obesity," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 41(1), April.
    14. James Mabli, 2014. "SNAP Participation and Urban and Rural Food Security," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 99ba5f92f8434d3084c34a7d9, Mathematica Policy Research.

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