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Spatial mobility and environmental effects on obesity

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  • Zhao, Zhenxiang
  • Kaestner, Robert
  • Xu, Xin

Abstract

In this paper, we used a randomized experiment, the Moving to Opportunity for Fair Housing Demonstration (MTO) study, to assess whether several environmental attributes are causes of obesity. To accomplish our objective, we linked the MTO data with several external data sources that provide information on potential determinants of obesity including food prices, restaurant and food store availability, physical activity facility availability, the prevalence of crime and population density. We find that the environmental factors we examined are unable to explain the observed decrease in obesity associated with the MTO experiment among low-income minority women.

Suggested Citation

  • Zhao, Zhenxiang & Kaestner, Robert & Xu, Xin, 2014. "Spatial mobility and environmental effects on obesity," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 14(C), pages 128-140.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:14:y:2014:i:c:p:128-140
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ehb.2013.12.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Raftopoulou, Athina, 2017. "Geographic determinants of individual obesity risk in Spain: A multilevel approach," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 185-193.

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    Keywords

    Obesity; Environmental characteristics;

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