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Do Prices and Attributes Explain International Differences in Food Purchases?

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  • Dubois, Pierre
  • Griffith, Rachel
  • Nevo, Aviv

Abstract

Food purchases differ substantially across countries. We use detailed household level data from the US, France and the UK to (i) document these differences; (ii) esti- mate a demand system for food and nutrients, and (iii) simulate counterfactual choices if households faced prices and nutritional characteristics from other countries. We find that differences in prices and characteristics are important and can explain some difference (e.g., US-France difference in caloric intake), but generally cannot explain many of the compositional patterns by themselves. Instead, it seems an interaction between the economic environment and differences in preferences is needed to explain cross country differences.

Suggested Citation

  • Dubois, Pierre & Griffith, Rachel & Nevo, Aviv, 2013. "Do Prices and Attributes Explain International Differences in Food Purchases?," TSE Working Papers 13-370, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE), revised May 2013.
  • Handle: RePEc:tse:wpaper:26732
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • L10 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - General

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