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Overweight: What Are its Costs and What Could Be Done?

Author

Listed:
  • Kolosnitsyna, Marina

    () (Research University Higher School of Economics, Russia)

  • Berdnikova, Arina

    () (Research University Higher School of Economics, Russia)

Abstract

Global patterns of overweight and obesity trends, main factors influencing the process and instruments for public intervention are discussed. Special attention is paid to implications (economic costs) of overweight. By using RLMS data the authors estimate prevalence of overweight and obesity in Russia and identify its specific features. Estimations of direct and indirect costs of overweight for Russia are provided.

Suggested Citation

  • Kolosnitsyna, Marina & Berdnikova, Arina, 2009. "Overweight: What Are its Costs and What Could Be Done?," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 15(3), pages 72-93.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:apltrx:0007
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    File URL: http://pe.cemi.rssi.ru/pe_2009_3_72-93.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Beate Sander & Rito Bergemann, 2003. "Economic burden of obesity and its complications in Germany," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 4(4), pages 248-253, December.
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    3. Susan Averett & Sanders Korenman, 1996. "The Economic Reality of the Beauty Myth," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(2), pages 304-330.
    4. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2003. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(3), pages 93-118, Summer.
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    6. Timothy J. Richards & Paul M. Patterson & Abebayehu Tegene, 2007. "Obesity And Nutrient Consumption: A Rational Addiction?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 25(3), pages 309-324, July.
    7. Chou, Shin-Yi & Grossman, Michael & Saffer, Henry, 2004. "An economic analysis of adult obesity: results from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 565-587, May.
    8. John Cawley, 2004. "The Impact of Obesity on Wages," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(2).
    9. Ruhm Christopher J, 2007. "Current and Future Prevalence of Obesity and Severe Obesity in the United States," Forum for Health Economics & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(2), pages 1-28, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alexey Kalinin & Marina Kolosnitsyna & Liudmila Zasimova, 2011. "Healthy Lifestyles in Russia: Old Issues and New Policies," HSE Working papers WP BRP 02/PA/2011, National Research University Higher School of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    overweight; obesity; public health; body mass index; direct and indirect costs of overweight;

    JEL classification:

    • I15 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Economic Development
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • J17 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Value of Life; Foregone Income

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