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The Effects of a Fat Tax on Dairy Products

Author

Listed:
  • Chouinard, Hayley H
  • Davis, David E.
  • LaFrance, Jeffrey T.
  • Perloff, Jeffrey M

Abstract

We apply an incomplete demand system to supermarket scanner data to estimate the effects of a fat tax on dairy products for different demographic groups. We find own-price elasticities of demand are relatively inelastic and vary little across groups. A fat tax may be an effective means to raise revenue, but will not result in a significant reduction in fat consumption. The welfare effects associated with a fat tax are large and vary greatly across demographic groups. These fat taxes are regressive in nature, as the elderly and poor suffer greater welfare losses.

Suggested Citation

  • Chouinard, Hayley H & Davis, David E. & LaFrance, Jeffrey T. & Perloff, Jeffrey M, 2005. "The Effects of a Fat Tax on Dairy Products," Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley, Working Paper Series qt60t1f3tn, Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:agrebk:qt60t1f3tn
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bergtold, Jason S. & Akobundu, Eberechukwu & Peterson, Everett B., 2004. "The FAST Method: Estimating Unconditional Demand Elasticities for Processed Foods in the Presence of Fixed Effects," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 1-20, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rahkovsky, Ilya & Gregory, Christian A., 2013. "Food prices and blood cholesterol," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 95-107.
    2. Yoon, Jangho & Brown, Timothy T., 2011. "Does the promotion of community social capital reduce obesity risk?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 296-305, May.
    3. Nordstrom, Jonas & Thunstrom, Linda, 2007. "Effects of Economic Policies Aimed at Encouraging a Healthier Grain Consumption," 2007 1st Forum, February 15-17, 2007, Innsbruck, Austria 6611, International European Forum on System Dynamics and Innovation in Food Networks.
    4. Leffler, Kristyn K. & Carpio, Carlos E. & Boonsaeng, Tullaya, 2012. "Temporal Aggregation and Treatment of Zero Dependent Variables in the Estimation of Food Demand using Cross-Sectional Data," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124913, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Allais, Olivier & Bertail, Patrice & Nichele, Veronique, 2008. "The Effects of a "Fat Tax" on the Nutrient Intake of French Households," 2008 International Congress, August 26-29, 2008, Ghent, Belgium 43967, European Association of Agricultural Economists.

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