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The effect of fast-food restaurants on childhood obesity: A school level analysis

  • Alviola, Pedro A.
  • Nayga, Rodolfo M.
  • Thomsen, Michael R.
  • Danforth, Diana
  • Smartt, James

We analyze, using an instrumental variable approach, the effect of the number of fast-food restaurants on school level obesity rates in Arkansas. Using distance to the nearest major highway as an instrument, our results suggest that exposure to fast-food restaurants can impact weight outcomes. Specifically, we find that the number of fast-food restaurants within a mile from the school can significantly affect school level obesity rates.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics & Human Biology.

Volume (Year): 12 (2014)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 110-119

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:12:y:2014:i:c:p:110-119
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622964

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