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Crisis-induced depression, physical activity and dietary intake among young adults: Evidence from the 9/11 terrorist attacks

  • Wang, Yang
  • Yang, Muzhe
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    Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we provide evidence that young adults respond to crisis-induced depression by exercising less and having breakfast less often. Exogenous variation in the crisis-induced depression is obtained through a unique event in our sample period – the 9/11 terrorist attacks. We compare those who were interviewed just before and just after 9/11 and find a significant and sharp increase in the symptoms of depression. We also provide evidence that this increase is not a September effect, but an effect of the external traumatic event.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics & Human Biology.

    Volume (Year): 11 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 206-220

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:11:y:2013:i:2:p:206-220
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