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Mental Health Cost Of Terrorism: Study Of The Charlie Hebdo Attack In Paris


  • Young-Il Kim

    (School of Economics, Sogang University, Seoul)

  • Dongyoung Kim

    (School of Economics, Sogang University, Seoul)


This paper examines whether a terrorist attack in a developed country without a major damage to its capital stocks affects mental health of the residents of target country. By exploiting the variations in survey dates of European Social Survey (ESS), we use difference-in-differences strategy to show that the attack adversely affects subjective well-being and mental health measures of French respondents. These negative effects are stronger for the immigrants and the single people. The impact is less dramatic for politically extreme right-wing supporters. The distance from the origin and residency in border countries have little impact on the measures.

Suggested Citation

  • Young-Il Kim & Dongyoung Kim, 2016. "Mental Health Cost Of Terrorism: Study Of The Charlie Hebdo Attack In Paris," Working Papers 1613, Research Institute for Market Economy, Sogang University.
  • Handle: RePEc:sgo:wpaper:1613

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    13. Kevin Milligan, 2005. "Subsidizing the Stork: New Evidence on Tax Incentives and Fertility," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(3), pages 539-555, August.
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    17. Gary S. Becker & Yona Rubinstein, 2011. "Fear and the Response to Terrorism: An Economic Analysis," CEP Discussion Papers dp1079, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
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    19. Wang, Yang & Yang, Muzhe, 2013. "Crisis-induced depression, physical activity and dietary intake among young adults: Evidence from the 9/11 terrorist attacks," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 206-220.
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    More about this item


    Charlie Hebdo; Mental health; Terrorism; Subjective well-being; Cost of terrorism.;

    JEL classification:

    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being

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