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A Spatial Analysis of Obesity in West Virginia

Listed author(s):
  • Anura Amarasinghe

    (Division of Resource Management, West Virginia University)

  • Gerard D'Souza

    ()

    (Division of Resource Management, West Virginia University)

  • Cheryl Brown

    ()

    (Division of Resource Management, West Virginia University)

  • Tatiana Borisova

    ()

    (University of Florida)

Registered author(s):

    A spatial panel data analysis at the county level examines how individual food consumption, recreational, and lifestyle choices ? against a backdrop of changing demographic, built environment, and policy factors ? leads to obesity. Results suggest that obesity tends to be spatially autocorrelated; in addition to hereditary factors and lifestyle choices, it is also caused by sprawl and lack of land use planning. Policy measures which stimulate educational attainment, poverty alleviation, and promotion of better land use planning and best consumption practices (BCPs) could both reduce obesity and result in sustainable development of regions where obesity is prevalent and the economy is lagging.

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    File URL: http://rri.wvu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/2006-13wp.pdf
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    Paper provided by Regional Research Institute, West Virginia University in its series Working Papers with number Working Paper 2006-13.

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    Length: 38 pages
    Date of creation: 2006
    Handle: RePEc:rri:wpaper:2006wp13
    Contact details of provider: Postal:
    886 Chestnut Ridge Road, P.O. Box 6825, Morgantown, WV 26506-6825

    Phone: 304 293 2896
    Fax: 304 293 6699
    Web page: http://rri.wvu.edu/research/working-papers/
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    10. Fukuda, Yoshiharu & Nakamura, Keiko & Takano, Takehito, 2004. "Municipal socioeconomic status and mortality in Japan: sex and age differences, and trends in 1973-1998," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 59(12), pages 2435-2445, December.
    11. Marcouiller, David W. & Deller, Steven C., 1996. "Natural Resource Stocks, Flows, and Regional Economic Change: Seeing the Forest and the Trees," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 26(2).
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    13. Jonathan Gruber & Michael Frakes, 2005. "Does Falling Smoking Lead to Rising Obesity?," NBER Working Papers 11483, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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