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An Economic Evaluation of Life-Style and Air-pollution-related Damages: Results from the BRFSS

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  • Cinzia Di Novi

    () (Collegio Carlo Alberto, University of Turin and Department of Public Policy and Public Choice - POLIS, University of Eastern Piedmont, Alessandria)

Abstract

This paper uses the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (2001) data in conjunctions with Environmental Protection Agency data to investigate on how individual health habits, air outdoor pollution and diseases combine to affect the likelihood of good health status and the amount of health investments. The environment is a second-best world characterized by uncertainty on the level of health, in which individuals are not able to avoid health shocks completely. Models are estimated using three different measures of overall health: a measure of self-assessed health and two health outcomes indicators (blood pressure and activity limitations due to health problems).

Suggested Citation

  • Cinzia Di Novi, 2007. "An Economic Evaluation of Life-Style and Air-pollution-related Damages: Results from the BRFSS," JEPS Working Papers 07-001, JEPS.
  • Handle: RePEc:jep:wpaper:07001
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    File URL: http://jeps.repec.org/papers/07-001.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gerking, Shelby & Stanley, Linda R, 1986. "An Economic Analysis of Air Pollution and Health: The Case of St. Louis," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 68(1), pages 115-121, February.
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    6. Kenneth Y. Chay & Michael Greenstone, 2003. "The Impact of Air Pollution on Infant Mortality: Evidence from Geographic Variation in Pollution Shocks Induced by a Recession," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(3), pages 1121-1167.
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    Cited by:

    1. Marco Faillo & Stefania Ottone & Lorenzo Sacconi, 2015. "The social contract in the laboratory. An experimental analysis of self-enforcing impartial agreements," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 163(3), pages 225-246, June.
    2. Marco Faillo & Stefania Ottone & Lorenzo Sacconi, 2008. "Compliance by believing: an experimental exploration on social norms and impartial agreements," Department of Economics Working Papers 0810, Department of Economics, University of Trento, Italia.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health production; multivariate probit; life-style; pollution; self-assessed health; health outcome;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • Q25 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Water

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