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Obesity, weight loss, and physician's advice

Author

Listed:
  • Loureiro, Maria L.
  • Nayga, Rodolfo Jr

Abstract

Despite the increasing prevalence and economic costs of obesity in the USA, many physicians and other health care professionals do not advise their overweight and obese patients about weight loss. Using the 2001-2003 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data the purpose of our research is to investigate the relationship between individuals' receipt of physician's advice on weight loss and their tendency to eat fewer calories and fat or to use physical activity to lose weight. We find that physician's advice to lose weight has positive effects on both the probability of eating fewer calories and fat to lose weight and on the probability of using exercise to lose weight.

Suggested Citation

  • Loureiro, Maria L. & Nayga, Rodolfo Jr, 2006. "Obesity, weight loss, and physician's advice," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(10), pages 2458-2468, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:62:y:2006:i:10:p:2458-2468
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2003. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(3), pages 93-118, Summer.
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    5. Rodolfo Nayga, 2001. "Effect of Schooling on Obesity: Is Health Knowledge a Moderating Factor?," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 129-137.
    6. Kenkel, Donald S, 1991. "Health Behavior, Health Knowledge, and Schooling," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(2), pages 287-305, April.
    7. Jeffrey M Wooldridge, 2010. "Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 0262232588, January.
    8. Contoyannis, Paul & Jones, Andrew M., 2004. "Socio-economic status, health and lifestyle," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 965-995, September.
    9. Kan, Kamhon & Tsai, Wei-Der, 2004. "Obesity and risk knowledge," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 907-934, September.
    10. Chou, Shin-Yi & Grossman, Michael & Saffer, Henry, 2004. "An economic analysis of adult obesity: results from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 565-587, May.
    11. Mark C. Berger & J. Paul Leigh, 1989. "Schooling, Self-Selection, and Health," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 24(3), pages 433-455.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Berning, Joshua, 2015. "The role of physicians in promoting weight loss," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 104-115.
    2. Tafreschi, Darjusch, 2015. "The income body weight gradients in the developing economy of China," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 16(C), pages 115-134.
    3. repec:eee:chieco:v:44:y:2017:i:c:p:253-270 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Bodea, Tudor D. & Garrow, Laurie A. & Meyer, Michael D. & Ross, Catherine L., 2009. "Socio-demographic and built environment influences on the odds of being overweight or obese: The Atlanta experience," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 43(4), pages 430-444, May.
    5. Morris, Stephen & Gravelle, Hugh, 2008. "GP supply and obesity," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1357-1367, September.

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