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Obesity, weight loss, and physician's advice

Listed author(s):
  • Loureiro, Maria L.
  • Nayga, Rodolfo Jr

Despite the increasing prevalence and economic costs of obesity in the USA, many physicians and other health care professionals do not advise their overweight and obese patients about weight loss. Using the 2001-2003 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System data the purpose of our research is to investigate the relationship between individuals' receipt of physician's advice on weight loss and their tendency to eat fewer calories and fat or to use physical activity to lose weight. We find that physician's advice to lose weight has positive effects on both the probability of eating fewer calories and fat to lose weight and on the probability of using exercise to lose weight.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277-9536(05)00601-5
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

Volume (Year): 62 (2006)
Issue (Month): 10 (May)
Pages: 2458-2468

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Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:62:y:2006:i:10:p:2458-2468
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References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Kenkel, D.S., 1988. "Health Behavior, Health Knowledge, And Schooling," Papers 10-88-3, Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics.
  2. Silvia Balia & Andrew M Jones, 2005. "Mortality, lifestyle and socio-economic status," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 05/02, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  3. Contoyannis, Paul & Jones, Andrew M., 2004. "Socio-economic status, health and lifestyle," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 965-995, September.
  4. Kamhon KAN & Wei-Der TSAI, 2004. "Obesity and Risk Knowledge," IEAS Working Paper : academic research 04-A002, Institute of Economics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan.
  5. Donald S. Kenkel & Joseph V. Terza, 2001. "The effect of physician advice on alcohol consumption: count regression with an endogenous treatment effect," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(2), pages 165-184.
  6. Jeffrey M Wooldridge, 2010. "Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 2, volume 1, number 0262232588.
  7. Darius Lakdawalla & Tomas Philipson, 2002. "The Growth of Obesity and Technological Change: A Theoretical and Empirical Examination," NBER Working Papers 8946, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. David Cutler & Edward Glaeser & Jesse Shapiro, 2003. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese?," NBER Working Papers 9446, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Mark C. Berger & J. Paul Leigh, 1989. "Schooling, Self-Selection, and Health," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 24(3), pages 433-455.
  10. Shin-Yi Chou & Michael Grossman & Henry Saffer, 2002. "An Economic Analysis of Adult Obesity: Results from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System," NBER Working Papers 9247, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Rodolfo Nayga, 2001. "Effect of Schooling on Obesity: Is Health Knowledge a Moderating Factor?," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 129-137.
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