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An Economic Analysis of Obesity in Europe: Health, Medical Care and Absenteeism Costs

  • Anna Sanz de Galdeano

Obesity is not only a health but also an economic phenomenon with potentially important direct and indirect economic costs that are unlikely to be fully internalized by the obese. In the US, obesity prevalence is the highest among OECD countries and the issue has long been the focus of policy debate and academic research. However, European obesity rates are rising and there is still a lack of economic analysis of the obesity phenomenon in Europe. This paper attempts to fill in this gap by using longitudinal micro-evidence from the European Community Household Panel to assess the importance of several costs of obesity in nine EU countries. The analysis provides nationally comparable estimates of the costs of obesity in terms of health, use of health care services and absenteeism.

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Paper provided by FEDEA in its series Working Papers with number 2007-38.

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Date of creation: Dec 2007
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Handle: RePEc:fda:fdaddt:2007-38
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