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Obesity and labor market outcomes in Denmark

  • Greve, Jane

This paper analyzes the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and employment status and wages. The analysis uses a unique data set from a Danish panel survey from 1995 and 2000, combined with administrative registers, covering 8000 individuals. Results show a negative effect of BMI on employment for women and an inverted u-shaped effect for men. Results further indicate that in the private sector BMI has a negative effect on wages for women but an inverted u-shaped effect on wages for men, whereas results from the public sector show that BMI has no influence on wages for either men or women.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B73DX-4TK92GN-1/2/b880d1f83a7e172a11d3973b1c0832d0
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics & Human Biology.

Volume (Year): 6 (2008)
Issue (Month): 3 (December)
Pages: 350-362

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:6:y:2008:i:3:p:350-362
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622964

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