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Body weight and wages: Evidence from Add Health

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  • Sabia, Joseph J.
  • Rees, Daniel I.

Abstract

This note uses data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to examine the relationship between body weight and wages. Ordinary least squares (OLS) and individual fixed effects estimates provide evidence that overweight and obese white women are paid substantially less per hour than their slimmer counterparts. Two-stage least squares (2SLS) estimation confirms this relationship, suggesting that it is not driven by time-variant unobservables.

Suggested Citation

  • Sabia, Joseph J. & Rees, Daniel I., 2012. "Body weight and wages: Evidence from Add Health," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 14-19.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:10:y:2012:i:1:p:14-19
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ehb.2011.09.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Berning, Joshua, 2015. "The role of physicians in promoting weight loss," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 104-115.
    2. Mosca, Irene, 2013. "Body mass index, waist circumference and employment: Evidence from older Irish adults," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 522-533.
    3. Donna Gilleskie & Euna Han & Edward Norton, 2017. "Disentangling the Contemporaneous and Dynamic Effects of Human and Health Capital on Wages over the Life Cycle"," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 25, pages 350-383, April.
    4. Resul Cesur & Joseph J. Sabia & Inas Rashad Kelly & Muzhe Yang, 2017. "The effect of breastfeeding on young adult wages: new evidence from the add health," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 25-51, March.
    5. repec:eee:ehbiol:v:28:y:2018:i:c:p:38-52 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Kinge, Jonas Minet, 2015. "Body mass index and employment status: a new look," HERO On line Working Paper Series 2015:3, Oslo University, Health Economics Research Programme.
    7. Kinge, Jonas Minet & Morris, Stephen, 2014. "Variation in the relationship between BMI and survival by socioeconomic status in Great Britain," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 12(C), pages 67-82.
    8. Kinge, Jonas Minet, 2016. "Waist circumference, body mass index and employment outcomes," HERO On line Working Paper Series 2016:4, Oslo University, Health Economics Research Programme.
    9. repec:spr:izalbr:v:6:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1186_s40172-017-0059-y is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Guardado, José R. & Ziebarth, Nicolas R., 2013. "A Model of Worker Investment in Safety and Its Effects on Accidents and Wages," IZA Discussion Papers 7428, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Kinge, Jonas Minet, 2016. "Body mass index and employment status: A new look," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 117-125.
    12. repec:eee:ehbiol:v:26:y:2017:i:c:p:96-111 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. repec:eee:ehbiol:v:28:y:2018:i:c:p:160-172 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Mosca, Irene, 2012. "Obesity and Employment in Ireland: Moving Beyond BMI," Papers WP431, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    15. repec:eee:ehbiol:v:27:y:2017:i:pa:p:154-166 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. repec:spr:eujhec:v:18:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s10198-016-0833-y is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Pinkston, Joshua C., 2017. "The dynamic effects of obesity on the wages of young workers," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 27(PA), pages 154-166.
    18. Kim, Tae Hyun & Han, Euna, 2015. "Impact of body mass on job quality," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 17(C), pages 75-85.
    19. Hübler, Olaf, 2017. "Health and Body Mass Index: No Simple Relationship," IZA Discussion Papers 10620, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Obesity; Body weight; Wages;

    JEL classification:

    • I0 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General
    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics

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