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A Spatial Economic Analysis of Urban Land Use and Obesity

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  • Andrew J. Plantinga
  • Stephanie Bernell

Abstract

We analyze an urban spatial model to examine the possible link between urban land use and obesity. Households maximize utility defined over housing, weight, and food subject to a fixed time budget allocated to commuting, calorie expenditure, and work. Our model explains the observed correspondence between high obesity rates and low development densities, but implies that these are determined endogenously in a spatial market equilibrium. We study the sorting of residents by attributes such as income, initial weight, and weight preferences, and examine the impacts on weight and density of urban design modifications that lower the costs of calorie expenditure. Copyright Blackwell Publishers, 2005

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew J. Plantinga & Stephanie Bernell, 2005. "A Spatial Economic Analysis of Urban Land Use and Obesity," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(3), pages 473-492.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:45:y:2005:i:3:p:473-492
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Darius Lakdawalla & Tomas Philipson, 2002. "The Growth of Obesity and Technological Change: A Theoretical and Empirical Examination," Working Papers 0203, Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ingrid Gould Ellen & Katherine O'Regan, 2010. "Welcome To The Neighborhood: How Can Regional Science Contribute To The Study Of Neighborhoods?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(1), pages 363-379.
    2. Anura Amarasinghe & Gerard D'Souza & Cheryl Brown & Tatiana Borisova, 2006. "A Spatial Analysis of Obesity in West Virginia," Working Papers Working Paper 2006-13, Regional Research Institute, West Virginia University.
    3. repec:rri:wpaper:200613 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Cho, Seong-Hoon & Kim, Seung Gyu & Roberts, Roland K., 2009. "Measuring the Effects of a Land Value Tax on Land Development," 2009 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2009, Atlanta, Georgia 46760, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
    5. Boncinelli, Fabio & Riccioli, Francesco & Marone, Enrico, 2015. "Do forests help to keep my body mass index low?," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 11-17.
    6. Mouhcine Guettabi & Abdul Munasib, 2014. "“Space Obesity”: The Effect of Remoteness on County Obesity," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(4), pages 518-548, December.
    7. Mouhcine Guettabi & Abdul Munasib, 2014. "Urban Sprawl, Obesogenic Environment, And Child Weight," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(3), pages 378-401, June.

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