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Do Income Constraints Inhibit Spending on Fruits and Vegetables Among Low-Income Households?

  • Stewart, Hayden
  • Blisard, Noel
  • Jolliffe, Dean

This study assesses whether income constraints inhibit spending on fruits and vegetables among low-income households. If this is the case, then it is hypothesized that the distribution of expenditures on fruits and vegetables by low-income households should be stochastically dominated by the distribution of expenditures on these same food items by other households. Moreover, it must be the case that low-income households would increase their spending on fruits and vegetables in response to an increase in their income. Using household data from the 2000 Consumer Expenditure Survey, a test of stochastic dominance is performed. Censored quantile regressions are also estimated at selected points of the conditional expenditure distribution. Low income households are found to spend less on fruits and vegetables than other households, but they are not responsive to changes in income.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/31064
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Article provided by Western Agricultural Economics Association in its journal Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

Volume (Year): 28 (2003)
Issue (Month): 03 (December)
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:31064
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://waeaonline.org/

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  1. Kantor, Linda Scott, 1998. "A Dietary Assessment of the U.S. Food Supply: Comparing Per Capita Food Consumption with Food Guide Pyramid Serving Recommendations," Agricultural Economics Reports 34079, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  2. Blisard, Noel & Variyam, Jayachandran N. & Cromartie, John, 2003. "Food Expenditures By U.S. Households: Looking Ahead To 2020," Agricultural Economics Reports 34045, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  3. Powell, James L., 1984. "Least absolute deviations estimation for the censored regression model," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 303-325, July.
  4. Cowell, F.A., 2000. "Measurement of inequality," Handbook of Income Distribution, in: A.B. Atkinson & F. Bourguignon (ed.), Handbook of Income Distribution, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 87-166 Elsevier.
  5. Dean Jolliffe & Bohdan Krushelnytskyy & Anastassia Semykina, 2001. "Censored least absolute deviations estimator: CLAD," Stata Technical Bulletin, StataCorp LP, vol. 10(58).
  6. Buchinsky, Moshe, 1995. "Estimating the asymptotic covariance matrix for quantile regression models a Monte Carlo study," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 303-338, August.
  7. Breunig, Robert & Dasgupta, Indraneel & Gundersen, Craig & Pattanaik, Prasanta, 2001. "Explaining The Food Stamp Cash-Out Puzzle," Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Reports 33869, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  8. Parke E. Wilde & Paul E. McNamara & Christine K. Ranney, 1999. "The Effect of Income and Food Programs on Dietary Quality: A Seemingly Unrelated Regression Analysis with Error Components," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 81(4), pages 959-971.
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