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Climate Change, Agriculture and Migration: Is there a Causal Relationship ?

Author

Listed:
  • Olper, A.
  • Falco, C.
  • Galeotti, M.

Abstract

Migration and climate change are two of the most important challenges the world currently faces. They are connected as climate change may stimulate migration. One of the sectors most strongly affected by climate change is agriculture, where most of the world s poor are employed. Climate change may affect agricultural productivity and hence migration because of its impact on average temperatures and rainfall and because it increases the frequency and intensity of weather shocks. This paper uses data from 1960 to 2010, for more than 150 countries, to analyse the relationship between weather variation, agricultural productivity and migration. Our main findings show that, in line with theoretical predictions, negative shocks to agricultural productivity caused by weather fluctuations significantly increase migration in middle and lower income countries but not in the poorest and in the rich countries. Acknowledgement :

Suggested Citation

  • Olper, A. & Falco, C. & Galeotti, M., 2018. "Climate Change, Agriculture and Migration: Is there a Causal Relationship ?," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277488, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae18:277488
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.277488
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/277488/files/1051.pdf
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    Environmental Economics and Policy;

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