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Empirical studies on agricultural impacts and adaptation

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  • Auffhammer, Maximilian
  • Schlenker, Wolfram

Abstract

Agricultural production is heavily dependent on weather outcomes, and hence climate change has the potential to significantly alter the sector's productivity. Both reduced form studies as well as integrated assessment models have found that the agricultural sector might experience significant impacts. We discuss the advantages of empirical reduced-form studies and their link and potential usefulness to integrated assessment models. We further discuss challenges facing empirical studies and recent research that looks at the longer term changes in climate and attempts to measure adaptation.

Suggested Citation

  • Auffhammer, Maximilian & Schlenker, Wolfram, 2014. "Empirical studies on agricultural impacts and adaptation," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 555-561.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:46:y:2014:i:c:p:555-561
    DOI: 10.1016/j.eneco.2014.09.010
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Climate change; Adaptation; Integrated assessment; Reduced form studies;

    JEL classification:

    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q15 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Land Ownership and Tenure; Land Reform; Land Use; Irrigation; Agriculture and Environment
    • Q55 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Technological Innovation

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