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Producer Responses to Surface Water Availability and Implications for Climate Change Adaptation

Author

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  • Dale T. Manning
  • Christopher Goemans
  • Alexander Maas

Abstract

Climate change is predicted to bring changes in weather and water availability. The effect on agriculture depends on the ability of producers to modify their practices in response to changing distributions. We develop a two-stage theoretical model of planting and irrigation decisions and use a unique dataset to empirically estimate how producers respond to changes in expected water availability and deviations from expectations. As water supplies decrease, producers respond by planting fewer acres and concentrating the application of water. Highlighting the importance of adaptation in this context, failure to account for this behavioral response overstates climate change impacts by 17%.

Suggested Citation

  • Dale T. Manning & Christopher Goemans & Alexander Maas, 2017. "Producer Responses to Surface Water Availability and Implications for Climate Change Adaptation," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 93(4), pages 631-653.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:landec:v:93:y:2017:i:4:p:631-653
    Note: DOI: 10.3368/le.93.4.631
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ji, Xinde & Cobourn, Kelly M. & Weng, Weizhe, 2018. "The Effect of Climate Change on Irrigated Agriculture: Water-Temperature Interactions and Adaptation in the Western U.S," 2018 Annual Meeting, August 5-7, Washington, D.C. 274306, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. Ji, Xinde & Cobourn, Kelly M., 2018. "Weather Fluctuation, Expectation Formation, and the Short-run Behavioral Responses to Climate Change," 2018 Annual Meeting, August 5-7, Washington, D.C. 274473, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Ghosh, Prasenjit & Miao, Ruiqing, 2018. "Agricultural Irrigation’s Responses to Federal Crop Insurance in the United States," 2018 Annual Meeting, August 5-7, Washington, D.C. 275667, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Q15 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Land Ownership and Tenure; Land Reform; Land Use; Irrigation; Agriculture and Environment
    • Q25 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Water

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