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Eating Out in the British Isles

Author

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  • Keelan, Conor D.
  • Henchion, Maeve M.
  • Newman, Carol F.

Abstract

This paper presents a comparative analysis of the foodservice industries in both Ireland and the UK. Each industry is analysed separately using the most recently available Household Budget Survey datasets for Ireland and the most recent Expenditure and Food Datasets for the UK and is disaggregated into quick-service (fast food and takeaway) and full-service (hotel and restaurant meals), the two largest components of each industry. A double hurdle model, adjusted for misspecification, is used in this analysis. A number of variables affect both dependent variables in the same way, for example, income and age and the number of workers variable, but differences are apparent throughout the discussion. Perhaps the most interesting point to highlight is how similar the Irish and UK results for both quick-service and full-service expenditure have been despite the UK industry being at a more mature stage of growth. Health awareness significantly reduces the likelihood of participation and reduces the amount of expenditure on quick-service but no similar effect is observed for full-service in either Ireland or the UK, which in itself is significant as the UK industry is more developed than its Irish equivalent.

Suggested Citation

  • Keelan, Conor D. & Henchion, Maeve M. & Newman, Carol F., 2008. "Eating Out in the British Isles," 82nd Annual Conference, March 31 - April 2, 2008, Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester, UK 36859, Agricultural Economics Society.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aes008:36859
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.36859
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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