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Employer Subsidized Meals and FAFH Consumption in Urban China

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  • Teng, Zhijing
  • Seale, James Jr.
  • Bai, Junfei
  • Wahl, Thomas I.

Abstract

This study investigates factors influencing household decisions on food away from home (FAFH) consumption with special interest given to the effects of employer subsidized meals on FAFH consumption. Using data from a new urban food consumption survey and collected by the Center for Chinese Agriculture Policy from 2009 to 2012 in 10 cities, a double-hurdle model is utilized to estimate the demand for FAFH as a whole and by type of facility (restaurant, fast-food outlet, and other facilities). The key findings suggest that households with at least one member receiving subsidized meals are more likely to participate in the FAFH market, but these households spend less when they dine out than their counterparts without employer subsidized meals.

Suggested Citation

  • Teng, Zhijing & Seale, James Jr. & Bai, Junfei & Wahl, Thomas I., 2015. "Employer Subsidized Meals and FAFH Consumption in Urban China," 2015 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2015, Atlanta, Georgia 196810, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:saea15:196810
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.196810
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/196810/files/SAEA_teng2_2015.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Liu, Haiyan & Wahl, Thomas I. & Seale, James L. & Bai, Junfei, 2015. "Household composition, income, and food-away-from-home expenditure in urban China," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 97-103.
    3. Hengyun Ma & Jikun Huang & Frank Fuller & Scott Rozelle, 2006. "Getting Rich and Eating Out: Consumption of Food Away from Home in Urban China," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 54(1), pages 101-119, March.
    4. Nayga, Rodolfo M., Jr., 1996. "Wife'S Labor Force Participation And Family Expenditures For Prepared Food, Food Prepared At Home, And Food Away From Home," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 25(2), pages 1-8, October.
    5. Jensen, Helen H. & Yen, S., 1995. "Wife's Employment and Food Expenditures Away from Home," Staff General Research Papers Archive 10523, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    6. Justo Manrique & Helen H. Jensen, 1998. "Working Women and Expenditures on Food Away‐From‐Home and At‐Home in Spain," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(3), pages 321-333, September.
    7. Seval Mutlu & Azucena Gracia, 2006. "Spanish food expenditure away from home (FAFH): by type of meal," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(9), pages 1037-1047.
    8. Patrick J. Byrne & Oral Capps & Atanu Saha, 1996. "Analysis of Food-Away-from-Home Expenditure Patterns for U.S. Households, 1982–89," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(3), pages 614-627.
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    10. Junfei Bai & Caiping Zhang & Fangbin Qiao & Tom Wahl, 2012. "Disaggregating household expenditures on food away from home in Beijing by type of food facility and type of meal," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 4(1), pages 18-35, January.
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    Keywords

    Consumer/Household Economics; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety;

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