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Analysis of Food-Away-from-Home Expenditure Patterns for U.S. Households, 1982–89

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  • Patrick J. Byrne
  • Oral Capps
  • Atanu Saha

Abstract

The two-step decision process for food-away-from-home (FAFH) consumption is empirically estimated using a generalization of the Heien and Wessells approach. Household information gathered by the National Panel Diary Group is used for the analysis. Marginal effects are corrected by untangling the respective variable impacts on the inverse Mills ratio. Expenditure and participation probability elasticities are similar to previous studies. Income elasticities are about 0.20, suggesting that the FAFH commodity is a necessary good for U.S. society. Northeastern households are less likely to consume FAFH than other households, but their expenditures are higher on average. Copyright 1996, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Patrick J. Byrne & Oral Capps & Atanu Saha, 1996. "Analysis of Food-Away-from-Home Expenditure Patterns for U.S. Households, 1982–89," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(3), pages 614-627.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:78:y:1996:i:3:p:614-627
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