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Infrequency of purchase and double-hurdle models of Irish households' meat expenditure


  • Carol Newman
  • Maeve Henchion


This paper examines the effect of households' socio-economic characteristics, which are assumed to underpin preferences, on the pattern of consumers' meat expenditure at a disaggregated level. We estimate meat expenditure equations and calculate the associated elasticities using cross-sectional household budget survey data, using infrequency of purchase and double-hurdle models adjusted for the problems of heteroscedasticity and non-normality of the error terms. The paper provides an overview of the econometric techniques applied, based on recent literature. We find evidence of declining income elasticities in relation to meat expenditure and identify the effects of households' socio-economic characteristics on their meat expenditure. These effects suggest that the meat expenditure decisions of certain household groups are influenced by the desire for convenience. Copyright 2001, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Carol Newman & Maeve Henchion, 2001. "Infrequency of purchase and double-hurdle models of Irish households' meat expenditure," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 28(4), pages 393-420, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:erevae:v:28:y:2001:i:4:p:393-420

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. R. Edwards & A. Parikh, 1976. "A Stochastic Policy Simulation of the World Coffee Economy," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 58(2), pages 152-160.
    2. Kawai, Masahiro, 1983. "Price Volatility of Storable Commodities under Rational Expectations in Spot and Futures Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 24(2), pages 435-459, June.
    3. Bray, Margaret M, 1981. "Futures Trading, Rational Expectations, and the Efficient Markets Hypothesis," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(3), pages 575-596, May.
    4. Turnovsky, Stephen J, 1983. "The Determination of Spot and Futures Prices with Storable Commodities," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 51(5), pages 1363-1387, September.
    5. Danthine, Jean-Pierre, 1978. "Information, futures prices, and stabilizing speculation," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 79-98, February.
    6. Alan H. Gelb, 1977. "Optimal Control and Stabilization Policy: An Application to the Coffee Economy," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 44(1), pages 95-109.
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    1. Kaiyatsa, Stevier, 2015. "Does the farm input subsidy program displace commercial fertilizer sales? Empirical evidence from agro-dealers in Malawi," Theses-Masters 252977, AgEcon Search.
    2. Eimear Leahy & Seán Lyons & Richard S. J. Tol, 2011. "Determinants of Vegetarianism and Meat Consumption Frequency in Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 42(4), pages 407-436.
    3. Tan, Andrew K. G. & Yen, Steven T. & Hasan, Abdul Rahman & Muhamed, Kamarudin, 2015. "Determinants of Purchase Likelihoods and Amounts Spent on Meat in Malaysia: A Sample Selection System Approach," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 44(1), April.
    4. Durham, Catherine A. & Pardoe, Iain & Vega-H, Esteban, 2004. "A Methodology for Evaluating How Product Characteristics Impact Choice in Retail Settings with Many Zero Observations: An Application to Restaurant Wine Purchase," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 29(01), April.
    5. Brida, Juan Gabriel & Disegna, Marta & Scuderi, Raffaele, 2012. "Visitors of two types of museums: do expenditure patterns differ?," MPRA Paper 38841, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Juan Brida & Pablo Daniel Monterubbianesi & Sandra Zapata-Aguirre, 2013. "Análisis de los factores que influencian el gasto de los turistas culturales: el caso de los visitantes de museos de Medellín," REVISTA DE ECONOMÍA DEL ROSARIO, UNIVERSIDAD DEL ROSARIO, June.
    7. Joshua Byrnes & Anthony Shakeshaft & Dennis Petrie & Christopher M. Doran, 2016. "Is response to price equal for those with higher alcohol consumption?," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 17(1), pages 23-29, January.
    8. Leahy, Eimear & Lyons, Seán & Tol, Richard S. J., 2010. "National Determinants of Vegetarianism," Papers WP341, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    9. Fanning, Jasper & Marsh, Thomas L. & Stiegert, Kyle W., 2002. "Determinants Of Fast Food Consumption," 2002 Annual Meeting, July 28-31, 2002, Long Beach, California 36637, Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    10. Eakins, John, 2016. "An application of the double hurdle model to petrol and diesel household expenditures in Ireland," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 84-93.
    11. Keelan, Conor D. & Henchion, Maeve M. & Newman, Carol F., 2006. "A double-hurdle model of Irish households' foodservice expenditure patterns," 98th Seminar, June 29-July 2, 2006, Chania, Crete, Greece 10083, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    12. Hikaru Hasegawa & Kazuhiro Ueda & Kunie Mori, 2008. "Estimation of Engel Curves from Survey Data with Zero Expenditures," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 70(4), pages 535-558, August.
    13. Akerele, Dare & Tiffin, R. & Srinivasan, C. S., 2013. "Household Food Demand in Nigeria: an Application of Multivariate Double-hurdle Model," 87th Annual Conference, April 8-10, 2013, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 158700, Agricultural Economics Society.
    14. Martinez-Espineira, Roberto, 2006. "A Box-Cox Double-Hurdle model of wildlife valuation: The citizen's perspective," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 192-208, June.
    15. Kuuluvainen, Jari & Karppinen, Heimo & Hänninen, Harri & Uusivuori, Jussi, 2014. "Effects of gender and length of land tenure on timber supply in Finland," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 363-379.
    16. Conor M. O'Toole & Carol Newman & Thia Hennessy, 2011. "The role of investment, fundamental Q and financing frictions in agricultural investment decisions: an analysis pre and post financial crisis," Working Papers 1101, Rural Economy and Development Programme,Teagasc.
    17. Keelan, Conor D. & Henchion, Maeve M. & Newman, Carol F., 2008. "Eating Out in the British Isles," 82nd Annual Conference, March 31 - April 2, 2008, Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester, UK 36859, Agricultural Economics Society.

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