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An Application of the Double Hurdle Model to Petrol and Diesel Household Expenditures in Ireland

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  • John Eakins

    () (School of Economics, University College Cork and Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), School of Economics, University of Surrey.)

Abstract

The objective of this study is to examine the determinants of household petrol and diesel expenditures using a large micro data set of Irish households. This research is timely given the switch in purchases from petrol cars to diesel cars arising out of changes in how vehicle registration tax and motor tax rates are calculated. The study finds that households living in urban areas, households that spend money on public transport and households that do not possess a car will spend less on both petrol and diesel. In contrast, households in possession of higher number of cars, households with more occupants working and households with higher level of household spending will spend more on petrol and diesel. The econometric methodology employed takes into account the fact that the dependent variable contains zero expenditures. Such an approach has never previously been applied to analyse Irish household transport use and provides interesting insights. In particular the effect that the explanatory variables have on participation in the market is quite different for petrol and diesel. For example, the model predicts a much larger increase in the probability that households will participate in the diesel market relative to the petrol market as income increases. This finding has implications for the design of policy toward reducing transport emissions as the Irish economy recovers and average household income increases.

Suggested Citation

  • John Eakins, 2014. "An Application of the Double Hurdle Model to Petrol and Diesel Household Expenditures in Ireland," Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), School of Economics Discussion Papers (SEEDS) 145, Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), School of Economics, University of Surrey.
  • Handle: RePEc:sur:seedps:145
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Broadstock, David C. & Li, Jiajia & Zhang, Dayong, 2016. "Efficiency snakes and energy ladders: A (meta-)frontier demand analysis of electricity consumption efficiency in Chinese households," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 383-396.
    2. Bartolini, Fabio & Brunori, Gianluca & Galli, Francesca, 2016. "Understanding motivations and determinants of direct sale strategy. The case of Tuscany Region," 149th Seminar, October 27-28, 2016, Rennes, France 244896, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. repec:wsi:wepxxx:v:03:y:2017:i:01:n:s2382624x16500193 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Benoît Laine & Alex Van Steenbergen, 2016. "Working Paper 03-16 - The fiscal treatment of company cars in Belgium: effects on car demand, travel behaviour and external costs," Working Papers 1603, Federal Planning Bureau, Belgium.
    5. repec:eee:enepol:v:117:y:2018:i:c:p:396-405 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Ivano D'Antonio, 2015. "Cooperazione e spesa in R&S: evidenze empiriche dalla Community Innovation Survey," STUDI ECONOMICI, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2015(116), pages 90-110.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Household Transport Demand; Petrol; Diesel; Double Hurdle Model; Income Elasticities.;

    JEL classification:

    • C34 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Truncated and Censored Models; Switching Regression Models
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices

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