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An Econometric Analysis of Charitable Donations in the Republic of Ireland

  • James Carroll

    (Dublin Institute of Technology, Aungier St, Dublin)

  • Siobhan McCarthy

    (Dublin Institute of Technology, Aungier St, Dublin)

  • Carol Newman

    (Trinity College Dublin, Dublin)

This paper explores the variables that affect the probability of donating to charity and those that affect the size of donations by Irish households. The dataset employed is the Irish Household Budget Survey (HBS) 1999/2000, which is analysed using a tobit model and doublehurdle model with an inverse hyperbolic sine transformation of the dependent variable. To date, there has been no prior econometric analysis of charitable donations in the Republic of Ireland.

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File URL: http://www.esr.ie/Vol36_3/03_Carroll_Article.pdf
File Function: First version, 2005
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Article provided by Economic and Social Studies in its journal Economic and Social Review.

Volume (Year): 36 (2005)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 229-249

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Handle: RePEc:eso:journl:v:36:y:2005:i:3:p:229-249
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  1. Carol Newman & Maeve Henchion & Alan Matthews, 2003. "A double-hurdle model of Irish household expenditure on prepared meals," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(9), pages 1053-1061.
  2. Melenberg, B. & van Soest, A.H.O., 1996. "Parametric and semi-parametric modelling of vacation expenditures," Other publications TiSEM 14de3e83-71c1-4e9a-aa5e-3, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
  3. Brooks, Arthur C., 2002. "Charitable Giving in Transition Economies: Evidence from Russia," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 55(4), pages 743-53, December.
  4. Steinberg, Richard S, 1987. "Voluntary Donations and Public Expenditures in a Federal System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(1), pages 24-36, March.
  5. Auten, Gerald & Joulfaian, David, 1996. "Charitable contributions and intergenerational transfers," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 55-68, January.
  6. Reynolds, Anderson & Shonkwiler, J S, 1991. "Testing and Correcting for Distributional Misspecifications in the Tobit Model: An Application of the Information Matrix Test," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 16(3), pages 313-23.
  7. Reece, William S, 1979. "Charitable Contributions: New Evidence on Household Behavior," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(1), pages 142-51, March.
  8. Edward Lazear & Ulrike Malmendier & Roberto Weber, 2006. "Sorting, Prices, and Social Preferences," NBER Working Papers 12041, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Feldstein, Martin S & Taylor, Amy, 1976. "The Income Tax and Charitable Contributions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 44(6), pages 1201-22, November.
  10. Kimhi, Ayal, 1999. "Double-Hurdle and Purchase-Infrequency Demand Analysis: A Feasible Integrated Approach," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 26(4), pages 425-42, December.
  11. Jones, Andrew M, 1992. "A Note on Computation of the Double-Hurdle Model with Dependence with an Application to Tobacco Expenditure," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(1), pages 67-74, January.
  12. Blundell, Richard & Meghir, Costas, 1987. "Bivariate alternatives to the Tobit model," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1-2), pages 179-200.
  13. Gao, Xiaoming & Wailes, Eric J. & Cramer, Gail L., 1995. "Double-Hurdle Model With Bivariate Normal Errors: An Application To U.S. Rice Demand," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 27(02), December.
  14. Cathy Pharoah & Sarah Tanner, 1997. "Trends in charitable giving," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 18(4), pages 427-444, January.
  15. Cragg, John G, 1971. "Some Statistical Models for Limited Dependent Variables with Application to the Demand for Durable Goods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 39(5), pages 829-44, September.
  16. McDonald, John F & Moffitt, Robert A, 1980. "The Uses of Tobit Analysis," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 62(2), pages 318-21, May.
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