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Estimating individual driving distance by car and public transport use in Sweden

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  • Olof Johansson-Stenman

Abstract

How much to drive, and how much to use public transport, are modelled as three and two level decisions, respectively, based on micro-data for Sweden. The choices whether to have a car, whether to drive given access to a car, and how much to drive given that the individual drives at all are then estimated using a three equation model. Also after correcting for other variables, such as income, men are driving much more, and using less public transport, compared to women. People living in big cities are less likely to drive, but those who do are on average driving about as much as others. Age and access to company cars are also important determinants for travel behaviour, but being a member of an environmental organization is not. Driving increases with income, but to a lower degree compared to most aggregated studies on national level. The difference is explained in a model with income dependent structural changes, implying that it becomes more difficult to live without a car when average income increases. This indirect effect is found to be of a similar size as the ordinary income elasticity typically found in cross-section analysis within a country or region.

Suggested Citation

  • Olof Johansson-Stenman, 2002. "Estimating individual driving distance by car and public transport use in Sweden," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(8), pages 959-967.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:34:y:2002:i:8:p:959-967 DOI: 10.1080/00036840110068823
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jan U. Becker & Sönke Albers, 2016. "The limits of analyzing service quality data in public transport," Transportation, Springer, pages 823-842.
    2. Hugh Hennessy & Richard S. J. Tol, 2011. "The Impact of Government Policy on Private Car Ownership in Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, pages 135-157.
    3. Commins, Nicola & Nolan, Anne, 2011. "The determinants of mode of transport to work in the Greater Dublin Area," Transport Policy, Elsevier, pages 259-268.
    4. Galit Cohen-Blankshtain, 2008. "Institutional constraints on transport policymaking: the case of company cars in Israel," Transportation, Springer, pages 411-424.
    5. Winston Koh & Roberto Mariano & Yiu Kuen Tse, 2007. "Open vs. sealed-bid auctions: testing for revenue equivalence under Singapore's vehicle quota system," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(1), pages 125-134.
    6. Nolan, Anne, 2010. "A dynamic analysis of household car ownership," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 44(6), pages 446-455, July.
    7. Hennessy, Hugh & Tol, Richard S. J., 2010. "The Impact of Climate Policy on Private Car Ownership in Ireland," Papers WP342, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    8. Copenhagen Economics, 2010. "Company Car Taxation," Taxation Papers 22, Directorate General Taxation and Customs Union, European Commission.
    9. Menz, Tobias & Welsch, Heinz, 2012. "Population aging and carbon emissions in OECD countries: Accounting for life-cycle and cohort effects," Energy Economics, Elsevier, pages 842-849.
    10. Alexia Prskawetz & Jiang Leiwen & Brian C. O Neill, 2004. "Demographic composition and projections of car use in Austria," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, pages 175-202.
    11. Alexia Fürnkranz-Prskawetz & Jiang Leiwen & Brian C. O´Neill, 2002. "Demographic composition and projections of car use in Austria," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2002-034, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    12. Edward Bendit & Amnon Frenkel & Sigal Kaplan, 2011. "Knowledge-workers and the sustainable city: the travel consequences of car-related job-perks," ERSA conference papers ersa11p389, European Regional Science Association.
    13. Commins, Nicola & Nolan, Anne, 2011. "The determinants of mode of transport to work in the Greater Dublin Area," Transport Policy, Elsevier, pages 259-268.
    14. Macharis, Cathy & De Witte, Astrid, 2012. "The typical company car user does not exist: The case of Flemish company car drivers," Transport Policy, Elsevier, pages 91-98.
    15. Steininger, Karl W. & Friedl, Birgit & Gebetsroither, Brigitte, 2007. "Sustainability impacts of car road pricing: A computable general equilibrium analysis for Austria," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 59-69, June.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise

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