IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/eneeco/v34y2012i3p842-849.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Population aging and carbon emissions in OECD countries: Accounting for life-cycle and cohort effects

Author

Listed:
  • Menz, Tobias
  • Welsch, Heinz

Abstract

This paper investigates the relationship between emissions of carbon dioxide and the ongoing process of demographic transition in OECD countries. Our research is motivated by suggestions in the literature that emission-relevant consumption patterns may depend on the position in the life cycle and on the birth cohort to which people belong. We augment standard macroeconomic emission regressions by including the age and cohort composition of the population. Our estimation results on a panel of data for 26 countries, spanning the period 1960–2005, suggest that both life-cycle and cohort effects belong in a macroeconomic emission function for carbon dioxide. We find that shifts in both the age and the cohort composition have contributed to rising carbon emissions in OECD countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Menz, Tobias & Welsch, Heinz, 2012. "Population aging and carbon emissions in OECD countries: Accounting for life-cycle and cohort effects," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 842-849.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:34:y:2012:i:3:p:842-849
    DOI: 10.1016/j.eneco.2011.07.016
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140988311001460
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Burke, Paul J., 2010. "Income, resources, and electricity mix," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 616-626, May.
    2. Shi, Anqing, 2003. "The impact of population pressure on global carbon dioxide emissions, 1975-1996: evidence from pooled cross-country data," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 29-42, February.
    3. Dalton, Michael & O'Neill, Brian & Prskawetz, Alexia & Jiang, Leiwen & Pitkin, John, 2008. "Population aging and future carbon emissions in the United States," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 642-675, March.
    4. Amy K. Richmond & Robert K. Kaufmann, 2006. "Energy Prices and Turning Points: The Relationship between Income and Energy Use/Carbon Emissions," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4), pages 157-180.
    5. Israel Debra & Levinson Arik, 2004. "Willingness to Pay for Environmental Quality: Testable Empirical Implications of the Growth and Environment Literature," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 3(1), pages 1-31, February.
    6. Stern, David I., 2004. "The Rise and Fall of the Environmental Kuznets Curve," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(8), pages 1419-1439, August.
    7. John B. Shoven, 2010. "New Age Thinking: Alternative Ways of Measuring Age, Their Relationship to Labor Force Participation, Government Policies, and GDP," NBER Chapters,in: Research Findings in the Economics of Aging, pages 17-31 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Carlsson-Kanyama, Annika & Linden, Anna-Lisa, 1999. "Travel patterns and environmental effects now and in the future:: implications of differences in energy consumption among socio-economic groups," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 405-417, September.
    9. Rehdanz, Katrin, 2007. "Determinants of residential space heating expenditures in Germany," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 167-182, March.
    10. Philippe Thalmann, 2004. "The Public Acceptance of Green Taxes: 2 Million Voters Express Their Opinion," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 119(1_2), pages 179-217, April.
    11. Olof Johansson-Stenman, 2002. "Estimating individual driving distance by car and public transport use in Sweden," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(8), pages 959-967.
    12. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:17:y:2007:i:5:p:1-11 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. York, Richard & Rosa, Eugene A. & Dietz, Thomas, 2003. "STIRPAT, IPAT and ImPACT: analytic tools for unpacking the driving forces of environmental impacts," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 351-365, October.
    14. Brantley Liddle, 2011. "Consumption-Driven Environmental Impact and Age Structure Change in OECD Countries," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 24(30), pages 749-770, May.
    15. Liddle, Brantley & Lung, Sidney, 2010. "Age-Structure, Urbanization, and Climate Change in Developed Countries: Revisiting STIRPAT for Disaggregated Population and Consumption-Related Environmental Impacts," MPRA Paper 59579, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Matthew A. Cole & Eric Neumayer, 2003. "Examining the Impact of Demographic Factors On Air Pollution," Labor and Demography 0312005, EconWPA, revised 13 May 2004.
    17. Ono, Tetsuo & Maeda, Yasuo, 2002. "Sustainable development in an aging economy," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(01), pages 9-22, February.
    18. Heijdra, Ben J. & Kooiman, Jan Peter & Ligthart, Jenny E., 2006. "Environmental quality, the macroeconomy, and intergenerational distribution," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 74-104, January.
    19. Hui Li & Robert P. Berrens & Therese Grijalva, 2007. "Economic growth and environmental quality: a meta-analysis of environmental Kuznets curve studies," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 17(5), pages 1-11.
    20. Yamasaki, Eiji & Tominaga, Norio, 1997. "Evolution of an aging society and effect on residential energy demand," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(11), pages 903-912, September.
    21. World Bank, 2009. "World Development Indicators 2009," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 4367.
    22. Farzin, Y. Hossein & Bond, Craig A., 2006. "Democracy and environmental quality," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 213-235, October.
    23. Brantley Liddle, 2003. "Demographic dynamics and per capita environmental impact: using panel regressions and household decompositions to examine population and transport," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2003-029, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    24. Brian R. Copeland & M. Scott Taylor, 1995. "Trade and the Environment: A Partial Synthesis," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 77(3), pages 765-771.
    25. Israel, Debra K., 2004. "International support for environmental protection," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 9(06), pages 757-780, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Wen Guo & Tao Sun & Hongjun Dai, 2016. "Effect of Population Structure Change on Carbon Emission in China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(3), pages 1-20, March.
    2. Zhang, Chuanguo & Tan, Zheng, 2016. "The relationships between population factors and China's carbon emissions: Does population aging matter?," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 1018-1025.
    3. KPEMOUA, Palakiyem, 2016. "Analyse Du Lien Entre Les Emissions De Co2, Leur Restriction Et La Croissance Economique Du Togo
      [Analysis Of The Nexus Between Co2 Emission, Their Restriction And Economic Growth Of Togo]
      ," MPRA Paper 77624, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 10 Oct 2016.
    4. repec:eee:rensus:v:77:y:2017:i:c:p:731-747 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Sambit Bhattacharyya & Maurizio Intartaglia & Andy McKay, 2016. "Does Climate Aid Affect Emissions? Evidence from a Global Dataset," CSAE Working Paper Series 2016-09, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    6. Sarah Harper, 2013. "Population–Environment Interactions: European Migration, Population Composition and Climate Change," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 55(4), pages 525-541, August.
    7. Liddle, Brantley, 2014. "Impact of population, age structure, and urbanization on carbon emissions/energy consumption: Evidence from macro-level, cross-country analyses," MPRA Paper 61306, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Day, Rosie, 2015. "Low carbon thermal technologies in an ageing society – What are the issues?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 250-256.
    9. Liddle, Brantley, 2015. "What Are the Carbon Emissions Elasticities for Income and Population? Bridging STIRPAT and EKC via robust heterogeneous panel estimates," MPRA Paper 61304, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Hasanov, Fakhri J. & Bulut, Cihan & Suleymanov, Elchin, 2016. "Do population age groups matter in the energy use of the oil-exporting countries?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 82-99.
    11. Zoundi, Zakaria, 2017. "CO2 emissions, renewable energy and the Environmental Kuznets Curve, a panel cointegration approach," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 1067-1075.
    12. repec:gam:jsusta:v:8:y:2016:i:3:p:225:d:65145 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Carbon emissions; Population aging; Demographic transition; Environmental Kuznets curve; Climate change;

    JEL classification:

    • Q40 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - General
    • Q25 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Water
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:34:y:2012:i:3:p:842-849. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/eneco .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.