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Car Ownership and Mode of Transport to Work in Ireland


  • Nicola Commins

    (Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin)

  • Anne Nolan

    (Economic and Social Research Institute, Dublin)


Rapid economic and demographic change in Ireland over the last decade, with associated increases in car dependence and congestion, has focused policy on encouraging more sustainable forms of travel. In this context, knowledge of current travel patterns and their determinants is crucial. In this paper, we extend earlier Irish research to examine the joint decision of car ownership and mode of transport to work. We employ cross-section micro-data from the 2006 Census of Population to estimate discrete choice models of car ownership and commuting mode choice for four sub-samples of the Irish population, based on residential location. Empirical results suggest that travel and supply-side characteristics such as travel time, costs, work location and public transport availability, as well as demographic and socio-economic characteristics such as age and household composition have significant effects on these decisions.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicola Commins & Anne Nolan, 2010. "Car Ownership and Mode of Transport to Work in Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 41(1), pages 43-75.
  • Handle: RePEc:eso:journl:v:41:y:2010:i:1:p:43-75

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. FitzGerald, John & Bergin, Adele & Conefrey, Thomas & Diffney, Sean & Duffy, David & Kearney, Ide & Lyons, Sean & Malaguzzi Valeri, Laura & Mayor, Karen & Richard S. J. Tol, 2008. "Medium-Term Review 2008-2015, No. 11," Forecasting Report, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number MTR11.
    2. Frances Ruane & Xiaoheng Zhang, 2007. "Location Choices of the Pharmaceutical Industry in Europe after 1992," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp220, IIIS.
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    Cited by:

    1. Eakins, John, 2016. "An application of the double hurdle model to petrol and diesel household expenditures in Ireland," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 84-93.
    2. John Eakins, 2013. "The Determinants of Household Car Ownership: Empirical Evidence from the Irish Household Budget Survey," Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), School of Economics Discussion Papers (SEEDS) 144, Surrey Energy Economics Centre (SEEC), School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    3. Hynes, Mike, 2016. "Developing (tele)work? A multi-level sociotechnical perspective of telework in Ireland," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 21-31.
    4. Driscoll, Áine & Lyons, Sean & Morgenroth, Edgar & Nolan, Anne, 2013. "Comparing the Determinants of Mode Choice across Travel Purposes," MPRA Paper 46034, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Michael Hynes, 2014. "Telework Isn’t Working: A Policy Review," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 45(4), pages 579-602.
    6. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:4:p:558-:d:95081 is not listed on IDEAS

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