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Gabriel Leon

Personal Details

First Name:Gabriel
Middle Name:
Last Name:Leon
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:ple447
https://gabrieljleon.wordpress.com

Affiliation

Department of Political Economy
King's College London

London, United Kingdom
http://www.kcl.ac.uk/sspp/departments/politicaleconomy/



22 Kingsway, First Floor, London WC2B 6NR
RePEc:edi:dekcluk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Toke Aidt & Gabriel Leon & Max Satchell, 2017. "The Social Dynamics of Collective Action: Evidence from the Captain Swing Riots, 1830-31," CESifo Working Paper Series 6773, CESifo.
  2. Toke S. Aidt & Gabriel Leon, 2014. "The Democratic Window of Opportunity: Evidence from Riots in sub-Saharan Africa," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1417, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  3. Leon, G., 2012. "Loyalty for Sale? Military Spending and Coups d'Etat," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1209, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  4. Gabriel Leon, 2009. "Soldiers or Bureaucrats?Conflict and the Military’s Role in Policy-Making," STICERD - Economic Organisation and Public Policy Discussion Papers Series 012, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
  5. Gabriel Leon, 2009. "Bad Apples: Political Paralysis and the Quality of Politicians," STICERD - Economic Organisation and Public Policy Discussion Papers Series 013, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.

Articles

  1. Toke S. Aidt & Gabriel Leon, 2016. "The Democratic Window of Opportunity," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 60(4), pages 694-717, June.
  2. Gabriel Leon, 2014. "Soldiers or politicians? Institutions, conflict, and the military’s role in politics," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(2), pages 533-556.
  3. Leon, Gabriel, 2014. "Strategic redistribution: The political economy of populism in Latin America," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 39-51.
  4. Gabriel Leon, 2014. "Loyalty for sale? Military spending and coups d’etat," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 159(3), pages 363-383, June.
  5. Gabriel Leon, 2013. "Bad Apples: Political Paralysis and the Quality of Politicians," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 15(3), pages 433-447, June.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Toke Aidt & Gabriel Leon & Max Satchell, 2017. "The Social Dynamics of Collective Action: Evidence from the Captain Swing Riots, 1830-31," CESifo Working Paper Series 6773, CESifo.

    Cited by:

    1. Jean Lacroix, 2020. "Ballots instead of Bullets? The effect of the Voting Rights Act on political violence," Working Papers CEB WP 20-007, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    2. Esteves, Rui & Geisler Mesevage, Gabriel, 2019. "Social Networks in Economic History: Opportunities and Challenges," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 74(C).
    3. Zareh Asatryan & Annika Havlik & Frank Streif, 2017. "Vetoing and inaugurating policy like others do: evidence on spatial interactions in voter initiatives," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 172(3), pages 525-544, September.
    4. Camilo García-Jimeno & Angel Iglesias & Pinar Yildirim, 2018. "Women, Rails and Telegraphs: An Empirical Study of Information Diffusion and Collective Action," NBER Working Papers 24495, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Geloso, Vincent & Kufenko, Vadim, 2019. "Can markets foster rebellion? The case of the 1837–38 rebellions in Lower Canada," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 166(C), pages 263-287.

  2. Toke S. Aidt & Gabriel Leon, 2014. "The Democratic Window of Opportunity: Evidence from Riots in sub-Saharan Africa," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1417, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.

    Cited by:

    1. Aidt, T.S. & Jensen, P.S., 2011. "Workers of the World, Unite! Franchise Extensions and the Threat of Revolution in Europe, 1820-1938," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1102, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    2. Christian Almer & Jeremy Laurent-Lucchetti & Manuel Oechslin, 2014. "Agricultural shocks and riots: A disaggregated analysis," Department of Economics Working Papers 24/14, University of Bath, Department of Economics.
    3. Filipe R. Campante & Davin Chor, 2012. "The People Want the Fall of the Regime": Schooling, Political Protest, and the Economy," Working Papers 08-2012, Singapore Management University, School of Economics.
    4. Aidt, T. S. & Leon, G. & Satchell, M., 2017. "The Social Dynamics of Collective Action: Evidence from the Captain Swing Riots, 1830-31," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1751, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    5. Achim Ahrens, 2015. "Civil conflicts in Africa: Climate, economic shocks, nighttime lights and spill-over effects," SEEC Discussion Papers 1501, Spatial Economics and Econometrics Centre, Heriot Watt University.
    6. Gerling, Lena, 2017. "Riots and the window of opportunity for coup plotters: Evidence on the link between urban protests and coups d'état," CIW Discussion Papers 2/2017, University of Münster, Center for Interdisciplinary Economics (CIW).
    7. Matthias Kalkuhl & Mekbib Haile & Lukas Kornher & Marta Kozicka, 2015. "Cost-benefit framework for policy action to navigate food price spikes. FOODSECURE Working Paper No 33," FOODSECURE Working papers 33, LEI Wageningen UR.
    8. Farzanegan, Mohammad Reza & Witthuhn, Stefan, 2017. "Corruption and political stability: Does the youth bulge matter?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 47-70.
    9. Paul Maarek & Michael T. Dorsch, 2015. "Rent seeking, revolutionary threat and coups in non-democracies," THEMA Working Papers 2015-13, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    10. Michael Dorsch & Karl Dunz & Paul Maarek, 2015. "Macro shocks and costly political action in non-democracies," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 162(3), pages 381-404, March.
    11. Gerling, Lena, 2017. "Riots and the Window of Opportunity for Coup Plotters: Evidence on the Link between Urban Protests and Coups d’État," VfS Annual Conference 2017 (Vienna): Alternative Structures for Money and Banking 168054, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    12. Ahrens Achim, 2015. "Civil Conflicts, Economic Shocks and Night-time Lights," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 21(4), pages 433-444, December.

  3. Leon, G., 2012. "Loyalty for Sale? Military Spending and Coups d'Etat," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1209, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.

    Cited by:

    1. Balima, Hippolyte Weneyam, 2020. "Coups d’état and the cost of debt," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(3), pages 509-528.
    2. Vincenzo Bove & Roberto Nisticò, 2014. "Coups d’état and defense spending: a counterfactual analysis," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 161(3), pages 321-344, December.
    3. Abel Escribà -Folch & Tobias Böhmelt & Ulrich Pilster, 2020. "Authoritarian regimes and civil–military relations: Explaining counterbalancing in autocracies," Conflict Management and Peace Science, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 37(5), pages 559-579, September.
    4. Gassebner, Martin & Gutmann, Jerg & Voigt, Stefan, 2016. "When to expect a coup d’état? An extreme bounds analysis of coup determinants," ILE Working Paper Series 3, University of Hamburg, Institute of Law and Economics.
    5. Kodila-Tedika, Oasis & Khalifa, Sherif, 2020. "African Junta and Defense Spending: A Capture Effect or Self-Preservation?," MPRA Paper 103599, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Oliver Pamp & Florian Dendorfer & Paul W. Thurner, 2018. "Arm your friends and save on defense? The impact of arms exports on military expenditures," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 177(1), pages 165-187, October.
    7. Bove, Vincenzo & Nisticò, Roberto, 2014. "Military in politics and budgetary allocations," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(4), pages 1065-1078.
    8. Vincenzo Bove & Jennifer Brauner, 2016. "The demand for military expenditure in authoritarian regimes," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(5), pages 609-625, September.
    9. Kawaura, Akihiko, 2018. "Generals in defense of allocation: Coups and military budgets in Thailand," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 72-78.
    10. Brauner Jennifer, 2012. "Military Spending and Democratisation," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 18(3), pages 1-16, December.
    11. Hippolyte Weneyam Balima, 2020. "Coups d'état and the foreign exchange market," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(7), pages 1928-1950, July.
    12. Dorsch, Michael T. & Maarek, Paul, 2018. "Rent extraction, revolutionary threat, and coups in non-democracies," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(4), pages 1082-1103.

  4. Gabriel Leon, 2009. "Soldiers or Bureaucrats?Conflict and the Military’s Role in Policy-Making," STICERD - Economic Organisation and Public Policy Discussion Papers Series 012, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.

    Cited by:

    1. Leon, G., 2012. "Loyalty for Sale? Military Spending and Coups d'Etat," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1209, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.

Articles

  1. Toke S. Aidt & Gabriel Leon, 2016. "The Democratic Window of Opportunity," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 60(4), pages 694-717, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Leopoldo Fergusson & Carlos Molina, 2020. "Facebook Causes Protests," Documentos de Trabajo LACEA 018004, The Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association - LACEA.
    2. Ticku, R. & Shrivastava, A. & Iyer, S., 2018. "Economic Shocks and Temple Desecrations in Medieval India," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1862, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    3. Aidt, T. S. & Leon, G. & Satchell, M., 2017. "The Social Dynamics of Collective Action: Evidence from the Captain Swing Riots, 1830-31," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1751, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    4. Klaus Gründler & Tommy Krieger, 2019. "Should We Care (More) About Data Aggregation? Evidence from Democracy Indices," CESifo Working Paper Series 7480, CESifo.
    5. Lena Gerling, 2018. "Rebellious Youth: Evidence on the Link between Youth Bulges, Institutional Bottlenecks, and Conflict," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 64(4), pages 577-616.
    6. Elkhan Richard Sadik-Zada, 2020. "Distributional Bargaining and the Speed of Structural Change in the Petroleum Exporting Labor Surplus Economies," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 32(1), pages 51-98, January.
    7. Hager, Anselm & Krakowski, Krzysztof & Schaub, Max, 2019. "Ethnic Riots and Prosocial Behavior: Evidence from Kyrgyzstan," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 1029-1044.

  2. Gabriel Leon, 2014. "Soldiers or politicians? Institutions, conflict, and the military’s role in politics," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(2), pages 533-556.

    Cited by:

    1. Oechslin, Manuel, 2014. "Targeting autocrats: Economic sanctions and regime change," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 24-40.

  3. Leon, Gabriel, 2014. "Strategic redistribution: The political economy of populism in Latin America," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 39-51.

    Cited by:

    1. Przeworski, Adam & Rivero, Gonzalo & Xi, Tianyang, 2015. "Elections as a conflict processing mechanism," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 235-248.
    2. N. Chesterley & P. Roberti, 2016. "Populism and Institutional Capture," Working Papers wp1086, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    3. Tribin, Ana, 2020. "Chasing votes with the public budget," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 63(C).
    4. Dodlova, Marina & Giolbas, Anna, 2015. "Regime Type, Inequality, and Redistributive Transfers in Developing Countries," GIGA Working Papers 273, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies.
    5. Bergh, Andreas & Bjørnskov, Christian, 2014. "Trust, welfare states and income equality: Sorting out the causality," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 183-199.
    6. Hancevic, Pedro & Cont, Walter & Navajas, Fernando, 2016. "Energy populism and household welfare," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 464-474.
    7. Dodlova, Marina & Giolbas, Anna & Lay, Jann, 2016. "Non-Contributory Social Transfer Programmes in Developing Countries: A New Data Set and Research Agenda," GIGA Working Papers 290, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies.
    8. Petar Stankov, 2018. "The Political Economy of Populism: An Empirical Investigation," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 60(2), pages 230-253, June.

  4. Gabriel Leon, 2014. "Loyalty for sale? Military spending and coups d’etat," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 159(3), pages 363-383, June.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 5 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-CDM: Collective Decision-Making (4) 2009-09-19 2014-07-21 2017-11-26 2018-01-08
  2. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (3) 2009-09-19 2012-03-08 2014-07-21
  3. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (2) 2017-11-26 2018-01-08
  4. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (2) 2017-11-26 2018-01-08
  5. NEP-AFR: Africa (1) 2014-07-21
  6. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2009-09-19
  7. NEP-GRO: Economic Growth (1) 2014-07-21

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