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Targeting autocrats: Economic sanctions and regime change

Listed author(s):
  • Oechslin, Manuel
Registered author(s):

    When it comes to international economic sanctions, the most frequent goal is regime change and democratization. Yet, past experiences suggest that such sanctions are often ineffective; moreover, quite paradoxically, targeted regimes tend to respond with policies that amplify the sanctions' harmful effects. This paper offers a political-economy model which provides an explanation for these observations. An autocratic regime lowers the supply of public goods to reduce private-sector productivity and hence the resources of potential challengers. As a result, sanctions-induced challenges become less likely, thereby buying the regime time to find exile opportunities. If these opportunities turn out to be of low quality, the regime prefers to hold out — and the sanctions fail.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0176268014000676
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal European Journal of Political Economy.

    Volume (Year): 36 (2014)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 24-40

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:poleco:v:36:y:2014:i:c:p:24-40
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ejpoleco.2014.07.003
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505544

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