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Matthew Lang

Personal Details

First Name:Matthew
Middle Name:
Last Name:Lang
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pla613
https://sites.google.com/site/matthewdlang18/
Terminal Degree:2010 Department of Economics; University of California-Santa Barbara (UCSB) (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of California-Riverside

Riverside, California (United States)
http://www.economics.ucr.edu/

(951) 827-3266
(951) 827-5685
4128 Sproul Hall, Riverside, CA 92521-0427
RePEc:edi:deucrus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Matthew D. Lang & Bree J. Lang, 2020. "Firearm Sales and the COVID-19 Pandemic," Working Papers 202008, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.
  2. Bostwick, Valerie & Fischer, Stefanie & Lang, Matthew, 2019. "Semesters or Quarters? The Effect of the Academic Calendar on Postsecondary Student Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 12429, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

Articles

  1. Mathew Lang, 2016. "State Firearm Sales and Criminal Activity: Evidence from Firearm Background Checks," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 83(1), pages 45-68, July.
  2. McManus, T. Clay & Schaur, Georg, 2016. "The effects of import competition on worker health," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 160-172.
  3. Jose Fernandez & Matthew Lang, 2015. "Suicide and Organ Donors: Spillover Effects of Mental Health Insurance Mandates," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(4), pages 491-497, April.
  4. Matthew Lang, 2013. "The Impact Of Mental Health Insurance Laws On State Suicide Rates," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(1), pages 73-88, January.
  5. Matthew Lang, 2013. "Firearm Background Checks and Suicide," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 123(12), pages 1085-1099, December.
  6. Hansen, Benjamin & Lang, Matthew, 2011. "Back to school blues: Seasonality of youth suicide and the academic calendar," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 850-861, October.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

RePEc Biblio mentions

As found on the RePEc Biblio, the curated bibliography of Economics:
  1. Matthew D. Lang & Bree J. Lang, 2020. "Firearm Sales and the COVID-19 Pandemic," Working Papers 202008, University of California at Riverside, Department of Economics.

    Mentioned in:

    1. > Economics of Welfare > Health Economics > Economics of Pandemics > Specific pandemics > Covid-19 > Economic consequences > Consumption > Hoarding

Wikipedia or ReplicationWiki mentions

(Only mentions on Wikipedia that link back to a page on a RePEc service)
  1. Matthew Lang, 2013. "Firearm Background Checks and Suicide," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 123(12), pages 1085-1099, December.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Firearm Background Checks and Suicide (EJ 2013) in ReplicationWiki ()

Working papers

    Sorry, no citations of working papers recorded.

Articles

  1. Mathew Lang, 2016. "State Firearm Sales and Criminal Activity: Evidence from Firearm Background Checks," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 83(1), pages 45-68, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Phillip B. Levine & Robin McKnight, 2020. "Not All School Shootings are the Same and the Differences Matter," NBER Working Papers 26728, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Hansen, Benjamin & Waddell, Glen R., 2018. "Legal access to alcohol and criminality," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 277-289.

  2. McManus, T. Clay & Schaur, Georg, 2016. "The effects of import competition on worker health," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 160-172.

    Cited by:

    1. Patralekha Ukil, 2019. "Parental Economic Shocks and Infant Health: The Effect of Import Competition in the U.S," Working papers 2019-18, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    2. Gihleb, Rania & Giuntella, Osea & Stella, Luca & Wang, Tianyi, 2020. "Industrial Robots, Workers' Safety, and Health," IZA Discussion Papers 13672, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Ulrich Schetter & Oriol Tejada, 2019. "On Globalization and the Concentration of Talent," CID Working Papers 121a, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    4. Rania Gihleb & Osea Giuntella & Luca Stella & Tianyi Wang, 2020. "Industrial Robots, Workers’ Safety, and Health," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 1107, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    5. Rafael Dix-Carneiro & Rodrigo R. Soares & Gabriel Ulyssea, 2018. "Economic Shocks and Crime: Evidence from the Brazilian Trade Liberalization," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 10(4), pages 158-195, October.
    6. Colantone, Italo & Crinò, Rosario & Ogliari, Laura, 2019. "Globalization and mental distress," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 181-207.
    7. Antonia Lopez Villavicencio & Maria Cervini, 2019. "The mental health consequences of globalisation," EconomiX Working Papers 2019-26, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    8. Justin R. Pierce & Peter K. Schott, 2016. "Trade Liberalization and Mortality : Evidence from U.S. Counties," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2016-094, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    9. Che, Yi & Xiao, Rui, 2020. "Import competition, fast-track authority and U.S. policy toward China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(4), pages 974-996.
    10. Herzer, Dierk, 2014. "The long-run relationship between trade and population health: evidence from five decades," VfS Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100441, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    11. Abeliansky, Ana Lucia & Beulmann, Matthias, 2019. "Are they coming for us? Industrial robots and the mental health of workers," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 379, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    12. Fan, Haichao & Lin, Faqin & Lin, Shu, 2020. "The hidden cost of trade liberalization: Input tariff shocks and worker health in China," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 126(C).
    13. Matthieu Crozet & Laura Hering & Sandra Poncet, 2018. "Looking for the Bright Side of the China Syndrome: Rising Export Opportunities and Life Satisfaction in China," Working Papers 2018-14, CEPII research center.
    14. Hummels, David & Munch, Jakob & Xiang, Chong, 2015. "No Pain, No Gain: The Effects of Exports on Job Injury and Sickness," 2015: Trade and Societal Well-Being, December 13-15, 2015, Clearwater Beach, Florida 229253, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
    15. Lu, Yi & Shao, Xiang & Tao, Zhigang, 2018. "Exposure to Chinese imports and media slant: Evidence from 147 U.S. local newspapers over 1998–2012," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 316-330.
    16. Dyballa, Katharina & Kraft, Kornelius, 2018. "Foreign competition and executive compensation in the manufacturing industry: A comparison between Germany and the U.S," ZEW Discussion Papers 18-034, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    17. Yan Du & Yi Lu, 2018. "The Great Opening up and the Roadmap for the Future: The Story of China's International Trade," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 26(2), pages 68-93, March.
    18. Matthew Lang & T. Clay McManus & Georg Schaur, 2019. "The effects of import competition on health in the local economy," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(1), pages 44-56, January.
    19. Brian Beach & John Lopresti, 2019. "Losing By Less? Import Competition, Unemployment Insurance Generosity, And Crime," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 57(2), pages 1163-1181, April.

  3. Jose Fernandez & Matthew Lang, 2015. "Suicide and Organ Donors: Spillover Effects of Mental Health Insurance Mandates," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(4), pages 491-497, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Ben Brewer, 2020. "Click it or give it: Increased seat belt law enforcement and organ donation," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(11), pages 1400-1421, November.
    2. Bilgel, Firat, 2020. "State Gun Control Laws, Gun Ownership and the Supply of Homicide Organ Donors," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C).

  4. Matthew Lang, 2013. "The Impact Of Mental Health Insurance Laws On State Suicide Rates," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(1), pages 73-88, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Yamamura, Eiji, 2015. "Social capital and views on suicide via the internet: a study using survey data," MPRA Paper 64071, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Mullins, Jamie & White, Corey, 2019. "Temperature and Mental Health: Evidence from the Spectrum of Mental Health Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 12603, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Brown, Timothy Tyler, 2014. "How effective are public health departments at preventing mortality?," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 13(C), pages 34-45.
    4. Johanna Catherine Maclean & Sebastian Tello-Trillo & Douglas Webber, 2019. "Losing insurance and behavioral health inpatient care: Evidence from a large-scale Medicaid disenrollment," NBER Working Papers 25936, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Robert Nathenson & Michael R. Richards, 2018. "Do coverage mandates affect direct-to-consumer advertising for pharmaceuticals? Evidence from parity laws," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 18(3), pages 321-336, September.
    6. Lenisa V. Chang, 2016. "The Effect Of State Insurance Mandates On Infant Immunization Rates," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(3), pages 372-386, March.
    7. Jose Fernandez & Matthew Lang, 2015. "Suicide and Organ Donors: Spillover Effects of Mental Health Insurance Mandates," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(4), pages 491-497, April.
    8. Maclean, J. Catherine & Tello-Trillo, Sebastian & Webber, Douglas A., 2019. "Losing Insurance and Behavioral Health Hospitalizations: Evidence from a Large-Scale Medicaid Disenrollment," IZA Discussion Papers 12463, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Yazbeck M & Xu H & Azocar F & Ettner SL, 2020. "Spousal Peer Effects in Specialty Behavioral Health Services Use: Do Spillovers Vary by Gender, Subscriber Status and Sexual Orientation?," Discussion Papers Series 630, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    10. Andersen, Martin, 2015. "Heterogeneity and the effect of mental health parity mandates on the labor market," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 74-84.
    11. Anderson, D. Mark & Sabia, Joseph J., 2016. "Child Access Prevention Laws, Youth Gun Carrying, and School Shootings," IZA Discussion Papers 9830, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    12. Ikeda Shin S., 2016. "Graphical analyses of occupation-wise suicide risk in Japan," GRIPS Discussion Papers 16-03, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.
    13. Jinqi Ye, 2017. "The Effects of State and Federal Mental Health Parity Laws on Working Time," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 200, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
    14. Li, Xiaoxue & Ye, Jinqi, 2017. "The spillover effects of health insurance benefit mandates on public insurance coverage: Evidence from veterans," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 45-60.
    15. Bilgel, Firat, 2020. "State Gun Control Laws, Gun Ownership and the Supply of Homicide Organ Donors," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C).
    16. Jamie Mullins & Corey White, 2018. "Temperature, Climate Change, and Mental Health: Evidence from the Spectrum of Mental Health Outcomes," Working Papers 1801, California Polytechnic State University, Department of Economics.

  5. Matthew Lang, 2013. "Firearm Background Checks and Suicide," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 123(12), pages 1085-1099, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Phillip B. Levine & Robin McKnight, 2020. "Not All School Shootings are the Same and the Differences Matter," NBER Working Papers 26728, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Christoph Koenig & David Schindler, 2019. "Impulse Purchases, Gun Ownership and Homicides: Evidence from a Firearm Demand Shock," CESifo Working Paper Series 7833, CESifo.
    3. Raul Caruso & Adelaide Baronchelli & Roberto Ricciuti, 2020. "Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons. Are embargoes effective?," Working Papers 1009, European Centre of Peace Science, Integration and Cooperation (CESPIC), Catholic University 'Our Lady of Good Counsel'.
    4. Alexander F. McQuoid & Charles Moore & Stephen Sawyer & David C. Vitt, 2017. "Trigger Warning: The Causal Impact of Gun Ownership on Suicide," Departmental Working Papers 55, United States Naval Academy Department of Economics.
    5. Bernd Hayo & Florian Neumeier & Christian Westphal, 2019. "The social costs of gun ownership revisited," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 56(1), pages 1-12, January.
    6. Balestra, Simone, 2018. "Gun prevalence and suicide," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 163-177.

  6. Hansen, Benjamin & Lang, Matthew, 2011. "Back to school blues: Seasonality of youth suicide and the academic calendar," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 850-861, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Chandler, Vincent & Heger, Dörte & Wuckel, Christiane, 2019. "The perils of returning to school: New insights into the seasonality of youth suicides," Ruhr Economic Papers 820, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    2. Jan Marcus & Simon Reif & Amelie Wuppermann & Amélie Rouche, 2019. "Increased Instruction Time and Stress-Related Health Problems among School Children," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1802, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    3. Daniel I. Rees & Joseph J. Sabia & Gokhan Kumpas, 2020. "Anti-Bullying Laws and Suicidal Behaviors among Teenagers," NBER Working Papers 26777, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Cuffe, H.E. & Harbaugh, W.T. & Lindo, J.M. & Musto, G. & Waddell, G.R., 2012. "Evidence on the efficacy of school-based incentives for healthy living," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 1028-1036.
    5. Markussen, Simen & Røed, Knut, 2015. "Daylight and absenteeism – Evidence from Norway," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 16(C), pages 73-80.
    6. Gregory Gilpin, 2018. "Policy-induced School Calendar Changes and Teacher Moonlighting," CAEPR Working Papers 2018-009, Center for Applied Economics and Policy Research, Department of Economics, Indiana University Bloomington.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 2 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-GEN: Gender (1) 2020-05-11
  2. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2020-05-11
  3. NEP-IAS: Insurance Economics (1) 2020-07-13

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