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Tao Sherry Kong

Personal Details

First Name:Tao Sherry
Middle Name:
Last Name:Kong
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pko375

Affiliation

北京大学 社会科学调查中心 (Peking University, Institute of Social Science Survey)

http://www.isss.edu.cn
Beijing

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Chapters

Working papers

  1. Frijters, Paul & Kong, Tao Sherry & Liu, Elaine M., 2015. "Who Is Coming to the Artefactual Field Experiment? Participation Bias among Chinese Rural Migrants," IZA Discussion Papers 8843, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  2. Elaine Liu & Paul Frijters & Tao Sherry Kong, 2013. "Who is Coming to the Experiment? A Cautionary Tale from China," Working Papers 201309854, Department of Economics, University of Houston.
  3. Frijters, Paul & Kong, Tao Sherry & Meng, Xin, 2011. "Migrant Entrepreneurs and Credit Constraints under Labour Market Discrimination," IZA Discussion Papers 5967, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  4. Tao Kong, 2011. "Governance Quality and Economic Growth," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2011-537, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
  5. Meng, Xin & Kong, Sherry Tao & Zhang, Dandan, 2010. "How Much Do We Know about the Impact of the Economic Downturn on the Employment of Migrants?," ADBI Working Papers 194, Asian Development Bank Institute.
  6. Tao (Sherry) Kong, 2006. "Institutions as a Determinant of Economic Growth," EABER Working Papers 21828, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.

Articles

  1. Frijters, Paul & Kong, Tao Sherry & Liu, Elaine M., 2015. "Who is coming to the artefactual field experiment? Participation bias among Chinese rural migrants," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 62-74.
  2. Sherry Tao Kong, 2014. "Middle Class China: Identity and Behaviour by Minglu Chen and David S.G. Goodman Edward Elgar , Cheltenham, UK , 2013 Pp. 204. ISBN 978 1 78100 570 5," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 28(1), pages 195-197, May.
  3. Sherry Tao Kong, 2014. "Breaking Barriers: Portraits of Inspiring Chinese-Indonesian Women," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(1), pages 145-146, April.
  4. Jane Golley & Sherry Tao Kong, 2013. "Inequality in Intergenerational Mobility of Education in China," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 21(2), pages 15-37, March.
  5. Tao Kong & Arief Ramayandi, 2008. "Survey Of Recent Developments," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(1), pages 7-32.
  6. Tao Kong, 2007. "A Selective Review of Recent Developments in the Economic Growth Literature," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 21(1), pages 1-33, May.

Chapters

  1. Sherry Tao Kong, 2010. "Rural–Urban Migration in China: Survey Design and Implementation," Chapters, in: Xin Meng & Chris Manning & Li Shi & Tadjuddin Nur Effendi (ed.),The Great Migration, chapter 7, Edward Elgar Publishing.
  2. Sherry Tao Kong & Xin Meng, 2010. "The Educational and Health Outcomes of the Children of Migrants," Chapters, in: Xin Meng & Chris Manning & Li Shi & Tadjuddin Nur Effendi (ed.),The Great Migration, chapter 5, Edward Elgar Publishing.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Tao Kong, 2011. "Governance Quality and Economic Growth," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2011-537, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Nuevo gobierno: ¿mejor gobernanza y crecimiento?
      by Florentino Felgueroso in Nada Es Gratis on 2011-12-16 11:56:48
  2. Elaine Liu & Paul Frijters & Tao Sherry Kong, 2013. "Who is Coming to the Experiment? A Cautionary Tale from China," Working Papers 201309854, Department of Economics, University of Houston.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Working paper on Chinese experiments
      by ? in Core Economics on 2013-07-11 11:50:00
    2. Who is Coming to the Experiment?
      by UDADISI in UDADISI on 2013-04-22 17:35:00
    3. In which your lab experiment might not be entirely representative
      by Matt in Aid Thoughts on 2013-04-22 20:45:02
    4. Working paper on Chinese experiments
      by Paul Frijters in Core Economics on 2013-07-11 10:50:49

Working papers

  1. Frijters, Paul & Kong, Tao Sherry & Liu, Elaine M., 2015. "Who Is Coming to the Artefactual Field Experiment? Participation Bias among Chinese Rural Migrants," IZA Discussion Papers 8843, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Belot, Michele & James, Jonathan, 2013. "Partner Selection into Policy Relevant Field Experiments," SIRE Discussion Papers 2013-112, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
    2. Romero, Christina & Wollni, Meike, 2015. "The effect of opportunistic behavior on trust: An experimental approach," GlobalFood Discussion Papers 206382, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
    3. Eble,Alex & Boone,Peter & Elbourne,Diana, 2016. "On minimizing the risk of bias in randomized controlled trials in economics," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7746, The World Bank.
    4. Uri Gneezy & Alex Imas, 2016. "Lab in the Field: Measuring Preferences in the Wild," CESifo Working Paper Series 5953, CESifo.
    5. Hao, Li & Houser, Daniel & Mao, Lei & Villeval, Marie Claire, 2016. "Migrations, risks, and uncertainty: A field experiment in China," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 131(PA), pages 126-140.

  2. Elaine Liu & Paul Frijters & Tao Sherry Kong, 2013. "Who is Coming to the Experiment? A Cautionary Tale from China," Working Papers 201309854, Department of Economics, University of Houston.

    Cited by:

    1. Liu, Elaine M. & Meng, Juanjuan & Wang, Joseph Tao-yi, 2013. "Confucianism and Preferences: Evidence from Lab Experiments in Taiwan and China," IZA Discussion Papers 7684, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

  3. Frijters, Paul & Kong, Tao Sherry & Meng, Xin, 2011. "Migrant Entrepreneurs and Credit Constraints under Labour Market Discrimination," IZA Discussion Papers 5967, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Chen, Xiaofen, 2018. "Why do migrant households consume so little?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 197-209.
    2. Naudé, Wim & Siegel, Melissa & Marchand, Katrin, 2015. "Migration, entrepreneurship and development: A critical review," MERIT Working Papers 2015-033, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    3. Akgüc, Mehtap & Giulietti, Corrado & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2013. "The RUMiC Longitudinal Survey: Fostering Research on Labor Markets in China," IZA Discussion Papers 7860, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Marcus H. Böhme & Sarah Kups, 2017. "The economic effects of labour immigration in developing countries: A literature review," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 335, OECD Publishing.
    5. Akgüç, Mehtap & Liu, Xingfei & Tani, Massimiliano & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2016. "Risk attitudes and migration," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 166-176.
    6. Wim Naudé & Melissa Siegel & Katrin Marchand, 2017. "Migration, entrepreneurship and development: critical questions," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 6(1), pages 1-16, December.
    7. Christian Dustmann & Francesco Fasani & Xin Meng & Luigi Minale, 2015. "Risk Attitudes and Household Migration Decisions," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1514, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    8. L Rachel Ngai & Christopher A Pissarides & Jin Wang, 2018. "China’s Mobility Barriers and Employment Allocations," Discussion Papers 1811, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM).
    9. Yin, Zhichao & Gong, Xue & Guo, Peiyao & Wu, Tao, 2019. "What Drives Entrepreneurship in Digital Economy? Evidence from China," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 66-73.
    10. Xu, Hao, 2017. "The time use pattern and labour supply of the left behind spouse and children in rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(S), pages 77-101.
    11. Ngai, L. Rachel & Pissarides, Christopher & Wang, Jin, 2018. "China's mobility barriers and employment allocations," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 87619, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

  4. Tao Kong, 2011. "Governance Quality and Economic Growth," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2011-537, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Dogaru Dorin-Madalin, 2015. "Public Policy, Quality Of Intitution And Economic Growth In Central And Eastern European Countries," Annals - Economy Series, Constantin Brancusi University, Faculty of Economics, vol. 2, pages 239-245, April.

  5. Meng, Xin & Kong, Sherry Tao & Zhang, Dandan, 2010. "How Much Do We Know about the Impact of the Economic Downturn on the Employment of Migrants?," ADBI Working Papers 194, Asian Development Bank Institute.

    Cited by:

    1. You, Jing & Wang, Shaoyang, 2018. "Unemployment duration and job-match quality in urban China: The dynamic impact of 2008 Labor Contract Law," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 220-233.
    2. Wenjin Long & Simon Appleton & Lina Song, 2017. "The impact of job contact networks on wages of rural–urban migrants in China: a switching regression approach," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(1), pages 81-101, January.
    3. Qu, Zhaopeng (Frank) & Zhao, Zhong, 2016. "Glass Ceiling Effect in Urban China: Wage Inequality of Rural-Urban Migrants during 2002-2007," IZA Discussion Papers 10424, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Long, Wenjin & Appleton, Simon & Song, Lina, 2013. "Job Contact Networks and Wages of Rural-Urban Migrants in China," IZA Discussion Papers 7577, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

Articles

  1. Frijters, Paul & Kong, Tao Sherry & Liu, Elaine M., 2015. "Who is coming to the artefactual field experiment? Participation bias among Chinese rural migrants," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 62-74.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Jane Golley & Sherry Tao Kong, 2013. "Inequality in Intergenerational Mobility of Education in China," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 21(2), pages 15-37, March.

    Cited by:

    1. He Zhu & Tsunehiro OTSUKI, 2018. "Can Two Consecutive Generations’ Data Predict Longterm Intergenerational Transition? Evidence from China with three generations," OSIPP Discussion Paper 18E004, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.
    2. Zhou, Yixiao & Tyers, Rod, 2019. "Automation and inequality in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 58(C).
    3. Guo, Yumei & Song, Yang & Chen, Qianmiao, 2019. "Impacts of education policies on intergenerational education mobility in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 124-142.
    4. Jane Golley & Yixiao Zhou & Meiyan Wang, 2019. "Inequality of Opportunity in China's Labor Earnings: The Gender Dimension," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 27(1), pages 28-50, January.
    5. Alberto Alesina & Sebastian Hohmann & Stelios Michalopoulos & Elias Papaioannou, 2019. "Intergenerational Mobility in Africa," NBER Working Papers 25534, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Jere R. Behrman & Yuan Hu & Junsen Zhang, 2020. "The Causal Effects of Parents’ Schooling on Children’s Schooling in Urban China," PIER Working Paper Archive 20-005, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
    7. Haepp, Tobias & Lyu, Lidan, 2018. "The Impact of Primary School Investment Reallocation on Educational Attainment in Rural Areas of the People’s Republic of China," ADBI Working Papers 821, Asian Development Bank Institute.
    8. Golley, Jane & Kong, Sherry Tao, 2018. "Inequality of opportunity in China's educational outcomes," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 116-128.
    9. Valerio Mendoza, Octasiano M., 2018. "Heterogeneous determinants of educational achievement and inequality across urban China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 129-148.
    10. Magejo, Prudence & Benhura, Miracle & Gwatidzo, Tendai, 2014. "Trends in the Intergenerational Transmission of Education among Black South Africans," IZA Discussion Papers 8546, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    11. Florencia Torche, 2019. "Educational mobility in developing countries," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-88, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    12. Lijia Guo & Jiashun Huang & You Zhang, 2019. "Education Development in China: Education Return, Quality, and Equity," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(13), pages 1-20, July.
    13. Xiao Ma & Feiran Wang & Jiandong Chen & Yang Zhang, 2018. "The Income Gap Between Urban and Rural Residents in China: Since 1978," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 52(4), pages 1153-1174, December.
    14. Jingyi Huang & Yumei Guo & Yang Song, 2016. "Intergenerational transmission of education in China: Pattern, mechanism, and policies," Working Papers 415, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    15. Juwei Zhang & Jing Xiang, 2014. "How Aging and Intergeneration Disparity Influence Consumption Inequality in China," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 22(3), pages 79-100, July.

  3. Tao Kong & Arief Ramayandi, 2008. "Survey Of Recent Developments," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(1), pages 7-32.

    Cited by:

    1. Sim, Armand & Suryadarma, Daniel & Suryahadi, Asep, 2017. "The Consequences of Child Market Work on the Growth of Human Capital," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 144-155.
    2. M. Chatib Basri & Hal Hill, 2008. "Indonesia – Trade Policy Review 2007," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(11), pages 1393-1408, November.
    3. Arief Anshory Yusuf & Arief Ramayandi, 2008. "Reducing fuel subsidy or taxing carbon? Comparing the two instruments from the economy, environment, and equity perspective for Indonesia," Working Papers in Economics and Development Studies (WoPEDS) 200808, Department of Economics, Padjadjaran University, revised Oct 2008.

  4. Tao Kong, 2007. "A Selective Review of Recent Developments in the Economic Growth Literature," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 21(1), pages 1-33, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Colagrossi, Marco & Rossignoli, Domenico & Maggioni, Mario A., 2020. "Does democracy cause growth? A meta-analysis (of 2000 regressions)," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C).
    2. Miroslav Verbič & Boris Majcen & Olga Ivanova & Mitja Čok, 2011. "R&D and Economic Growth in Slovenia: A Dynamic General Equilibrium Approach with Endogenous Growth," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 58(1), pages 67-89, March.
    3. Van Hoa, Tran & Limskul, Kitti, 2013. "Economic impact of CO2 emissions on Thailand's growth and climate change mitigation policy: A modelling analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 651-658.
    4. Olannye A. P. & Okoro O. M., 2017. "Enhancing Organizational Performance through Human Resource Outsourcing in the Nigerian Deposit Money Banks," Journal of Management and Strategy, Journal of Management and Strategy, Sciedu Press, vol. 8(4), pages 67-78, August.
    5. Ali, Ershad & Talukder, Dayal, 2010. "Agricultural Trade Liberalisation and Economic Growth in Developing Countries: Analysis of Distributional Consequences," Estey Centre Journal of International Law and Trade Policy, Estey Centre for Law and Economics in International Trade, vol. 11(2), pages 1-13, August.
    6. Sonja S. Teelucksingh & Paulo A.L.D. Nunes, 2010. "Biodiversity Valuation in Developing Countries: A Focus on Small Island Developing States (SIDS)," Working Papers 2010.111, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    7. CHIKHURi, Krishna, 2014. "Agricultural Trade Liberalization and Economic Growth: Is there a connection in Sub-Saharan Africa?," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 14(1), pages 161-174.

Chapters

  1. Sherry Tao Kong, 2010. "Rural–Urban Migration in China: Survey Design and Implementation," Chapters, in: Xin Meng & Chris Manning & Li Shi & Tadjuddin Nur Effendi (ed.),The Great Migration, chapter 7, Edward Elgar Publishing.

    Cited by:

    1. Corrado Giulietti & Guangjie Ning & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2012. "Self-employment of rural-to-urban migrants in China," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 33(1), pages 96-117, March.
    2. Chen, Xiaofen, 2018. "Why do migrant households consume so little?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 197-209.
    3. Dupuy, Arnaud, 2018. "Migration in China: To Work or to Wed?," IZA Discussion Papers 11329, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Akgüc, Mehtap & Giulietti, Corrado & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2013. "The RUMiC Longitudinal Survey: Fostering Research on Labor Markets in China," IZA Discussion Papers 7860, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Yao, Yao & Chen, George S. & Salim, Ruhul & Yu, Xiaojun, 2018. "Schooling returns for migrant workers in China: Estimations from the perspective of the institutional environment in a rural setting," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 240-256.
    6. Patrick Arni & Marco Caliendo & Steffen Künn & Klaus Zimmermann, 2014. "The IZA evaluation dataset survey: a scientific use file," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-20, December.
    7. Akay, Alpaslan & Giulietti, Corrado & Robalino, Juan David & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2012. "Remittances and Well-Being among Rural-to-Urban Migrants in China," IZA Discussion Papers 6631, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Giulietti, Corrado & Wahba, Jackline & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2013. "Entrepreneurship of the Left-Behind," IZA Discussion Papers 7270, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Connelly, Rachel & Maurer-Fazio, Margaret, 2016. "Left behind, at-risk, and vulnerable elders in rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 140-153.
    10. Maurer-Fazio, Margaret & Connelly, Rachel & Thi Tran, Ngoc-Han, 2015. "Do Negative Native-Place Stereotypes Lead to Discriminatory Wage Penalties in China's Migrant Labor Markets?," IZA Discussion Papers 8842, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    11. Wang, Chunchao & Zhang, Chenglei & Ni, Jinlan, 2015. "Social network, intra-network education spillover effect and rural–urban migrants' wages: Evidence from China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 156-168.
    12. Yiwen Chen & Ioana Salagean & Benteng Zou, 2020. "Private Educational Expenditure Inequality between Migrant and Urban Households in China’s Cities," CREA Discussion Paper Series 20-03, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    13. Li, Yunrong, 2017. "The effects of formal and informal child care on the Mother's labor supply—Evidence from urban China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 227-240.
    14. Valerio Mendoza, Octasiano M., 2016. "Preferential policies and income inequality: Evidence from Special Economic Zones and Open Cities in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 228-240.
    15. Bayari, Celal, 2018. "Economy and Market in China: The State, Wage Labour and the Construction of the ‘China Price’," MPRA Paper 100900, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 04 Mar 2018.
    16. Anning Hu, 2017. "Using a discretized measure of academic performance to approximate primary and secondary effects in inequality of educational opportunity," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 51(4), pages 1627-1643, July.

  2. Sherry Tao Kong & Xin Meng, 2010. "The Educational and Health Outcomes of the Children of Migrants," Chapters, in: Xin Meng & Chris Manning & Li Shi & Tadjuddin Nur Effendi (ed.),The Great Migration, chapter 5, Edward Elgar Publishing.

    Cited by:

    1. Sylvie Démurger & Hui Xu, 2011. "Left-Behind Children and Return Decisions of Rural Migrants in China," Post-Print halshs-00957597, HAL.
    2. Yang, Guanyi & Bansak, Cynthia, 2020. "Does wealth matter? An assessment of China's rural-urban migration on the education of left-behind children," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 59(C).
    3. Costanza Biavaschi & Corrado Giulietti & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2015. "Sibling Influence on the Human Capital of the Left-Behind," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(4), pages 403-438.
    4. Lara Cockx, 2019. "Moving Towards a Better Future? Migration and Children's Health and Education," LICOS Discussion Papers 41119, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    5. Liu, Zhiqiang & Yu, Li & Zheng, Xiang, 2018. "No longer left-behind: The impact of return migrant parents on children's performance," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 184-196.
    6. Sylvie Démurger & Hui Xu, 2015. "Left-behind children and return migration in China," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-21, December.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 6 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-CNA: China (3) 2011-09-22 2013-04-20 2015-02-22
  2. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (3) 2013-04-20 2015-02-22 2015-02-22
  3. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (3) 2010-03-13 2011-09-22 2015-02-22
  4. NEP-TRA: Transition Economics (3) 2011-09-22 2015-02-22 2015-02-22
  5. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (2) 2010-03-13 2011-09-22
  6. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (1) 2011-09-22
  7. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (1) 2013-04-20
  8. NEP-CWA: Central & Western Asia (1) 2011-05-30
  9. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2013-04-20
  10. NEP-ENT: Entrepreneurship (1) 2011-09-22
  11. NEP-FDG: Financial Development & Growth (1) 2011-05-30
  12. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2011-09-22

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