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The Gift of Global Talent: Innovation Policy and the Economy

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  • William R. Kerr

Abstract

Talent is the most precious resource for today's knowledge-based economy, and a significant share of the US skilled workforce in technology fields is foreign born. The United States has long held a leading position in attracting global talent, but the gap between the United States and other countries is shrinking. Immigration policies like the H-1B visa program shape the admissions of foreign workers to the country and grant a particularly strong gatekeeping role to sponsoring firms and universities. This chapter explores the data around global talent flows and some of the economic implications of an employer-driven immigration approach.

Suggested Citation

  • William R. Kerr, 2020. "The Gift of Global Talent: Innovation Policy and the Economy," Innovation Policy and the Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 20(1), pages 1-37.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:ipolec:doi:10.1086/705637
    DOI: 10.1086/705637
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/705637
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    Cited by:

    1. Kerr, William R. & Robert-Nicoud, Frédéric, 2019. "Tech Clusters," CEPR Discussion Papers 14143, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers
    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor

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