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Firms and the Economics of Skilled Immigration

In: Innovation Policy and the Economy, Volume 15

  • Sari Pekkala Kerr
  • William R. Kerr
  • William F. Lincoln

Firms play a central role in the selection, sponsorship, and employment of skilled immigrants entering the United States for work through programs like the H-1B visa. This role has not been widely recognized in the literature, and the data to better understand it have only recently become available. This chapter discusses the evidence that has been assembled to date in understanding the impact of high skilled immigration from the perspective of the firm and the open areas that call for more research. Since much of the U.S. immigration process for skilled workers rests in the hands of employer firms, a stronger understanding of these implications is essential for future policy analysis, particularly for issues relating to fostering innovation.

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This chapter was published in:
  • William R. Kerr & Josh Lerner & Scott Stern, 2015. "Innovation Policy and the Economy, Volume 15," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number kerr14-1, September.
  • This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 13404.
    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:13404
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