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Brain Drain and Brain Gain: The Global Competition to Attract High-Skilled Migrants

Editor

Listed:
  • Boeri, Tito
    (Professor of Economics, Universita Bocconi and Scientific Director of Fondazione Rodolfo Debenedetti, Italy)

  • Brucker, Herbert
    (Professor of Economics, University of Bamberg, Germany and Head of Department, International Comparisons and European Integration, Institute for Employment Research (IAB))

  • Docquier, Frederic
    (Professor of Economics, Universite Catholique de Louvain, Belgium and Research Associate at the National Fund for Economic Research)

  • Rapoport, Hillel
    (Associate Professor, Bar-Ilan University, Israel)

Abstract

The worldwide race to attract talents is getting tougher. The US has been leading the race, with its ability to attract PhD candidates and graduates not only from emerging countries, but also from the European Union. However, a growing number of countries have adopted immigration policies specifically aimed at selecting and attracting skilled workers. This book describes the global competition to attract talents. It focuses in particular on two phenomena: the brain gain and brain drain associated with high-skilled migration. Part I provides an overview of immigration policies designed to draw in skilled workers. It describes the economic gains associated with skilled immigration in the destination countries and the main determinants of the inflows of skilled immigrants (such as wage premia on education and R&D spending). It also discusses why skill-selective immigration policies do not find more support in receiving countries and shows that interest groups are actively engaged in affecting policies towards skilled migrants. Part II examines the consequences of brain drain for the sending countries. It reviews the channels through which skilled emigration can affect the source countries and looks at remittances, return migration, diaspora externalities, and network effects that may compensate the sending countries for their loss of human capital. Contrary to traditional wisdom, the results indicate that most developing countries experience a net gain from skilled emigration. Contributors to this volume - Sascha Becker, University of Warwick Simone Bertoli, CERDI, University of Auvergne Tito Boeri, Universita Bocconi and Fondazione Rodolfo Debenedetti Herbert Brucker, University of Bamburg and IAB Frederic Docquier, Universite Catholique de Louvain Giovanni Facchini, University of Milan Anna Maria Mayda, Georgetown University Giovanni Peri, University of California, Davis Hillel Rapoport, Bar-Ilan University Antonio Spilimbergo, International Monetary Fund Alessandra Venturini, University of Turin

Suggested Citation

  • Boeri, Tito & Brucker, Herbert & Docquier, Frederic & Rapoport, Hillel (ed.), 2012. "Brain Drain and Brain Gain: The Global Competition to Attract High-Skilled Migrants," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199654826.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxp:obooks:9780199654826
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Masud Chand & Rosalie L. Tung, 2019. "Skilled immigration to fill talent gaps: A comparison of the immigration policies of the United States, Canada, and Australia," Journal of International Business Policy, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 2(4), pages 333-355, December.
    2. Frédéric Docquier & Joël Machado, 2016. "Global Competition for Attracting Talents and the World Economy," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 39(4), pages 530-542, April.
    3. William R. Kerr, 2020. "The Gift of Global Talent: Innovation Policy and the Economy," Innovation Policy and the Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 20(1), pages 1-37.
    4. Sari Pekkala Kerr & William Kerr & Çağlar Özden & Christopher Parsons, 2017. "High-Skilled Migration and Agglomeration," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 9(1), pages 201-234, September.
    5. Kanbur, Ravi, 2017. "Citizenship, Migration and Opportunity," CEPR Discussion Papers 12255, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Ferrucci, Edoardo & Lissoni, Francesco, 2019. "Foreign inventors in Europe and the United States: Diversity and Patent Quality," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(9), pages 1-1.
    7. Saara Koikkalainen, 2019. "Nordic Ties and British Lives? Migrant Capital and the Case of Nordic Migrants Living in London," Social Inclusion, Cogitatio Press, vol. 7(4), pages 171-180.
    8. Mathias Czaika & Christopher R. Parsons, 2017. "The Gravity of High-Skilled Migration Policies," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(2), pages 603-630, April.
    9. Casarico, Alessandra & Facchini, Giovanni & Frattini, Tommaso, 2018. "What drives the legalization of immigrants? Evidence from IRCA," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 258-273.
    10. Gilles Grenier & Yi Zhang, 2016. "The “Negative” Assimilation of Immigrants: a Counter-Example from the Canadian Labor Market," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 263-286, September.
    11. Joan Muysken & Thomas Ziesemer, 2014. "The Effect of Immigration on Economic Growth in an Ageing Economy," Bulletin of Applied Economics, Risk Market Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 35-63.
    12. Fernandez-Zubieta, Ana & Geuna, Aldo & Lawson, Cornelia, 2015. "What do We Know of the Mobility of Research Scientists and of its Impact on Scientific Production," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201522, University of Turin.
    13. Zanfrini Laura, 2016. "How Europe can Benefit from Immigration-Related “Diversity” – a Policy Paper," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 22(3), pages 295-326, August.

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