IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/joevec/v31y2021i1d10.1007_s00191-020-00687-3.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Supply chain dynamics with assortative matching

Author

Listed:
  • Caichun Chai

    (Nanjing University of Finance and Economics
    Nanjing University)

  • Eilin Francis

    (University of California at Santa Cruz)

  • Tiaojun Xiao

    (Nanjing University)

Abstract

This article studies the evolutionarily stable equilibria of one-manufacturer and one-retailer supply chains. Each agent chooses to be either shareholder-oriented or stakeholder-oriented based on its own preference, then gives its pricing decision. Supply chains are formed by two types of matching processes: uniform random matching and assortative matching. Results indicate that, under uniform random matching, only one evolutionarily stable equilibrium exists, namely, the strict Nash equilibrium where both manufacturer and retailer choose shareholder strategy. Under assortative matching, the strict Nash equilibrium may not be evolutionarily stable under sign-compatible dynamics. The equilibrium where both manufacturer and retailer choose stakeholder strategy may be evolutionarily stable for certain values of the indices of assortativity. Furthermore, an interior equilibrium is observed with assortative matching, and the boundary equilibrium may be an evolutionarily stable equilibrium in some special cases.

Suggested Citation

  • Caichun Chai & Eilin Francis & Tiaojun Xiao, 2021. "Supply chain dynamics with assortative matching," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 179-206, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:joevec:v:31:y:2021:i:1:d:10.1007_s00191-020-00687-3
    DOI: 10.1007/s00191-020-00687-3
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00191-020-00687-3
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: Access to the full text of the articles in this series is restricted.

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1007/s00191-020-00687-3?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Aloysius Siow, 2015. "Testing Becker's Theory of Positive Assortative Matching," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 409-441.
    2. Robert Shimer & Lones Smith, 2000. "Assortative Matching and Search," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 68(2), pages 343-370, March.
    3. Ingela Alger, 2010. "Public Goods Games, Altruism, and Evolution," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 12(4), pages 789-813, August.
    4. Andrew B. Bernard & Andreas Moxnes & Karen Helene Ulltveit-Moe, 2018. "Two-Sided Heterogeneity and Trade," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 100(3), pages 424-439, July.
    5. Pascoe, Sean & Proctor, Wendy & Wilcox, Chris & Innes, James & Rochester, Wayne & Dowling, Natalie, 2009. "Stakeholder objective preferences in Australian Commonwealth managed fisheries," Marine Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 750-758, September.
    6. Ingela Alger & Jörgen W. Weibull, 2013. "Homo Moralis—Preference Evolution Under Incomplete Information and Assortative Matching," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 81(6), pages 2269-2302, November.
    7. Arnaud Costinot & Jonathan Vogel & Su Wang, 2013. "An Elementary Theory of Global Supply Chains," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 80(1), pages 109-144.
    8. Hua, Zhongsheng & Li, Sijie, 2008. "Impacts of demand uncertainty on retailer's dominance and manufacturer-retailer supply chain cooperation," Omega, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 697-714, October.
    9. Sugita, Yoichi & Teshima, Kensuke & Seira, Enrique, 2016. "Assortative matching of exporters and importers," IDE Discussion Papers 610, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    10. Daniel Friedman, 1998. "On economic applications of evolutionary game theory," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 15-43.
    11. Donald Lien, 2002. "Competition between Nonprofit and For-Profit Firms," International Journal of Business and Economics, School of Management Development, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, vol. 1(3), pages 193-207, December.
    12. Schaffer, Mark E., 1989. "Are profit-maximisers the best survivors? : A Darwinian model of economic natural selection," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 29-45, August.
    13. Patrick Legros & Andrew F. Newman, 2007. "Beauty Is a Beast, Frog Is a Prince: Assortative Matching with Nontransferabilities," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 75(4), pages 1073-1102, July.
    14. Ni, Debing & Li, Kevin W. & Tang, Xiaowo, 2010. "Social responsibility allocation in two-echelon supply chains: Insights from wholesale price contracts," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 207(3), pages 1269-1279, December.
    15. Domenico De Giovanni & Fabio Lamantia, 2017. "Evolutionary dynamics of a duopoly game with strategic delegation and isoelastic demand," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 27(5), pages 877-903, November.
    16. Yasuhiro Shirata, 2012. "The evolution of fairness under an assortative matching rule in the ultimatum game," International Journal of Game Theory, Springer;Game Theory Society, vol. 41(1), pages 1-21, February.
    17. Kopel, Michael & Lamantia, Fabio & Szidarovszky, Ferenc, 2014. "Evolutionary competition in a mixed market with socially concerned firms," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 394-409.
    18. Friedman, Daniel, 1991. "Evolutionary Games in Economics," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(3), pages 637-666, May.
    19. Giacomo Boesso & Kamalesh Kumar, 2009. "Stakeholder prioritization and reporting: Evidence from Italy and the US," Accounting Forum, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(2), pages 162-175, June.
    20. Reinoud Joosten, 1996. "Deterministic evolutionary dynamics: a unifying approach," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 6(3), pages 313-324.
    21. Kenneth M. Amaeshi & Onyeka K. Osuji & Paul Nnodim, 2008. "Corporate Social Responsibility in Supply Chains of Global Brands: A Boundaryless Responsibility? Clarifications, Exceptions and Implications," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 81(1), pages 223-234, August.
    22. Alp E. Atakan, 2006. "Assortative Matching with Explicit Search Costs," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 74(3), pages 667-680, May.
    23. Patrick Legros & Andrew Newman, 2007. "Beauty is a beast, frog is a prince :assortative matching in a nontransferable world," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/7022, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    24. Hsueh, Che-Fu, 2014. "Improving corporate social responsibility in a supply chain through a new revenue sharing contract," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 151(C), pages 214-222.
    25. Heifetz, Aviad & Shannon, Chris & Spiegel, Yossi, 2007. "What to maximize if you must," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 133(1), pages 31-57, March.
    26. Theodore C. Bergstrom, 2003. "The Algebra of Assortative Encounters and the Evolution of Cooperation," International Game Theory Review (IGTR), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 5(03), pages 211-228.
    27. Blinder Alan S., 1993. "A Simple Note on the Japanese Firm," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 238-255, September.
    28. Marco Pagano & Paolo F. Volpin, 2005. "The Political Economy of Corporate Governance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(4), pages 1005-1030, September.
    29. Sirghi Nicoleta, 2013. "The Theory Of The Firm And The Evolutionary Games," Annals of Faculty of Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1(1), pages 533-542, July.
    30. Alger, Ingela & Weibull, Jörgen W., 2016. "Evolution and Kantian morality," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 56-67.
    31. Goering, Gregory E., 2012. "Corporate social responsibility and marketing channel coordination," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(2), pages 142-148.
    32. Friedman, Daniel & Sinervo, Barry, 2016. "Evolutionary Games in Natural, Social, and Virtual Worlds," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199981151.
    33. Ingela Alger, 2010. "Corrigendum: Public Goods Games, Altruism, and Evolution," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 12(6), pages 1135-1135, December.
    34. Becker, Gary S, 1973. "A Theory of Marriage: Part I," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(4), pages 813-846, July-Aug..
    35. Yi, Yuyin & Yang, Haishen, 2017. "Wholesale pricing and evolutionary stable strategies of retailers under network externality," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 259(1), pages 37-47.
    36. Schulhofer-Wohl, Sam, 2006. "Negative assortative matching of risk-averse agents with transferable expected utility," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 92(3), pages 383-388, September.
    37. Esther Blanco & Javier Lozano, 2015. "Ecolabels, uncertified abatement, and the sustainability of natural resources: an evolutionary approach," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 25(3), pages 623-647, July.
    38. Jeffrey S. Harrison & Douglas A. Bosse & Robert A. Phillips, 2010. "Managing for stakeholders, stakeholder utility functions, and competitive advantage," Strategic Management Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(1), pages 58-74, January.
    39. Boesso, Giacomo & Kumar, Kamalesh, 2009. "Stakeholder prioritization and reporting: Evidence from Italy and the US," Accounting forum, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 162-175.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Caichun Chai & Eilin Francis & Tiaojun Xiao, 0. "Supply chain dynamics with assortative matching," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-28.
    2. Sperisen, Benjamin & Wiseman, Thomas, 2020. "Too good to fire: Non-assortative matching to play a dynamic game," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 491-511.
    3. Jiabin Wu, 2020. "Labelling, homophily and preference evolution," International Journal of Game Theory, Springer;Game Theory Society, vol. 49(1), pages 1-22, March.
    4. Bilancini, Ennio & Boncinelli, Leonardo & Wu, Jiabin, 2018. "The interplay of cultural intolerance and action-assortativity for the emergence of cooperation and homophily," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 1-18.
    5. Lahkar, Ratul, 2019. "Elimination of non-individualistic preferences in large population aggregative games," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 150-165.
    6. Wu, Jiabin, 2017. "Political institutions and the evolution of character traits," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 260-276.
    7. Jiabin Wu, 2017. "Social Hierarchy and the Evolution of Behavior," International Game Theory Review (IGTR), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 19(04), pages 1-16, December.
    8. Alger, Ingela & Lehmann, Laurent & Weibull, Jörgen W., 2018. "Evolution of preferences in group-structured populations: genes, guns, and culture," IAST Working Papers 18-73, Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse (IAST), revised Oct 2019.
    9. Ingela Alger & Jörgen W. Weibull, 2013. "Homo Moralis—Preference Evolution Under Incomplete Information and Assortative Matching," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 81(6), pages 2269-2302, November.
    10. Sugita, Yoichi & Teshima, Kensuke & Seira, Enrique, 2016. "Assortative matching of exporters and importers," IDE Discussion Papers 610, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    11. Xiao Yu Wang, 2014. "Risk Sorting, Portfolio Choice, and Endogenous Informal Insurance," NBER Working Papers 20429, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Davidson, Carl & Heyman, Fredrik & Matusz, Steven & Sjöholm, Fredrik & Zhu, Susan Chun, 2014. "Globalization and imperfect labor market sorting," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 177-194.
    13. Chris Bidner, 2014. "A spillover-based theory of credentialism," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 47(4), pages 1387-1425, November.
    14. Alger, Ingela & Weibull, Jörgen W. & Lehmann, Laurent, 2020. "Evolution of preferences in structured populations: Genes, guns, and culture," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 185(C).
    15. Li, Sanxi & Sun, Hailin & Wang, Tong & Yu, Jun, 2016. "Assortative matching and risk sharing," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 163(C), pages 248-275.
    16. Chiappori, Pierre-André & Reny, Philip J., 2016. "Matching to share risk," Theoretical Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 11(1), January.
    17. Luc Arrondel & Nicolas Frémeaux, 2016. "‘For Richer, For Poorer’: Assortative Mating and Savings Preferences," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 83(331), pages 518-543, July.
    18. Davidson, Carl & Matusz, Steven J., 2012. "A model of globalization and firm-worker matching: How good is good enough?," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 5-15.
    19. Jan Eeckhout & Alireza Sepahsalari, 2020. "The Effect of Wealth on Worker Productivity," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 20/731, School of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    20. Chai Caichun & Zhu Hailong & Feng Zhangwei, 2018. "Evolutionary Stable Strategies for Supply Chains: Selfishness, Fairness, and Altruism," Journal of Systems Science and Information, De Gruyter, vol. 6(6), pages 532-551, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Assortative matching; Evolutionarily stable equilibrium; Stakeholder;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C73 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Stochastic and Dynamic Games; Evolutionary Games
    • D21 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Theory
    • L11 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Production, Pricing, and Market Structure; Size Distribution of Firms

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:joevec:v:31:y:2021:i:1:d:10.1007_s00191-020-00687-3. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Sonal Shukla or Springer Nature Abstracting and Indexing (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.