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The upside of pessimism − Biased beliefs and the paradox of the contented female worker

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  • Dawson, Chris
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    Both sexes display inaccuracies in estimating their labour market prospects, but in different directions. Consistent with the literature on sex differences in psychological bias, females are less optimistic than men and on average tend to be overly pessimistic. Optimism, measured as an upwardly biased perception of the labour market returns distribution, increases the likelihood of disappointment with realized performance. A substantial proportion of the female job satisfaction advantage appears to be associated with both overly pessimistic female expectations and overly optimistic male expectations. The implications of female pessimism on both job-search and gender earnings differentials is also discussed.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167268117300379
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

    Volume (Year): 135 (2017)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 215-228

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:135:y:2017:i:c:p:215-228
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2017.02.004
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jebo

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