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Do government ideology and fragmentation matter for reducing CO2-emissions? Empirical evidence from OECD countries

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  • Garmann, Sebastian
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    This paper empirically examines whether government ideology and government fragmentation have influenced the process of CO2-emission reductions in the time period 1992–2008. Using data from 19 OECD countries, I find that (1) right-wing governments are associated with emission reduction to a smaller extent than center and left-wing governments and (2) emissions are higher the more parties are in government. On the other hand, the distinction between majority and minority governments has no significant influence on emissions.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0921800914001621
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Ecological Economics.

    Volume (Year): 105 (2014)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 1-10

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:105:y:2014:i:c:p:1-10
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2014.05.011
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolecon

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