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Effects of labour-market institutions on employment, wages, R&D intensity and growth in 27 OECD countries: From theory to practice

Listed author(s):
  • Afonso, Óscar
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    We extend the existing literature by focusing on the implications of labour-market institutions on (i) relative (un)employment of unskilled labour, (ii) wage inequality in favour of skilled labour, (iii) R&D intensity, and (iv) the economic growth, and by considering 27 OECD countries. By linking the unskilled wage to the skilled one, due to the indexation of social benefits to per-capita income, we accommodate the observed short-medium-long run paths of the four variables – in (i), (ii), (iii) and (iv) – in all countries between 1991 and 2008. On average, the obtained results also reveal that: Continental-European countries present the highest skilled-labour share in production; Eastern-European countries record the highest size of R&D spillovers; Nordic countries have the highest share of skilled labour in the total population, R&D intensity, and proportionality factor related to the generosity of the (unemployment) benefits; and Eastern-Asian countries have the highest unskilled-labour share in production.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S026499931500365X
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economic Modelling.

    Volume (Year): 53 (2016)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 48-62

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:53:y:2016:i:c:p:48-62
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2015.11.009
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/30411

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