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Scale effects in Schumpeterian models of economic growth


  • Elias Dinopoulos

    (Department of Economics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA)

  • Peter Thompson

    (Department of Economics, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5882, USA)


Early models of Schumpeterian growth incorporate scale effects predicting that large economies grow faster than small economies, and that population growth causes accelerating per capita income growth. An absence of clear empirical evidence for these scale effects has led some researchers to question the foundations underlying the Schumpeterian approach to growth. This paper reviews empirical evidence on the relationship between scale and growth, and recent attempts to construct Schumpeterian growth models without scale effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Elias Dinopoulos & Peter Thompson, 1999. "Scale effects in Schumpeterian models of economic growth," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 157-185.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:joevec:v:9:y:1999:i:2:p:157-185

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item


    Economic growth ; R&D ; Scale effects;

    JEL classification:

    • O2 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights


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