IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/b/mtp/titles/0262193760.html
   My bibliography  Save this book

Dual Labor Markets: A Macroeconomic Perspective

Author

Listed:
  • Gilles Saint-Paul

    () (Toulouse School of Economics)

Abstract

The labor market consists of two tiers. Workers in the upper tier enjoy high wages, good benefits, and employment security, and they are often unionized. Workers in the lower tier experience low wages, high turnover, job insecurity, and little chance of promotion. Until now, dual labor market theory has focused mainly on microeconomic factors such as discrimination, poverty, and public welfare. Dual Labor Markets considers the macroeconomic implications of the dual market. The book uses theoretical models derived from the author's research over the past six years to analyze such policy issues as the level and persistence of unemployment, the level of real wages, the accumulation of human capital, and the political viability of labor market reform in the United States and Europe.

Suggested Citation

  • Gilles Saint-Paul, 1997. "Dual Labor Markets: A Macroeconomic Perspective," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262193760, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:mtp:titles:0262193760
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michael Kumhof & Evan C Tanner, 2005. "Government Debt; A Key Role in Financial Intermediation," IMF Working Papers 05/57, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Graciela L. Kaminsky & Carmen Reinhart, 2003. "The Center and the Periphery: The Globalization of Financial Turmoil," NBER Working Papers 9479, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Amartya Lahiri & Rajesh Singh & Carlos A. Vegh, 2007. "Optimal Exchange Rate Regimes: Turning Mundell-Fleming's Dictum on its Head," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, pages 249-270.
    4. Fabrizio Coricelli & Bostjan Jazbec & Igor Masten, 2008. "Sources and Obstacles for Growth in Transition Countries: The Role of Credit," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-00643347, HAL.
    5. repec:hal:journl:hal-00643347 is not listed on IDEAS
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Bjorn Bartling & Ernst Fehr & Klaus M. Schmidt, 2012. "Screening, Competition, and Job Design: Economic Origins of Good Jobs," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 834-864.
    2. Machikita, Tomohiro & Sato, Hitoshi, 2016. "Temporary jobs and globalization," IDE Discussion Papers 585, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    3. Bosch, Mariano & Esteban-Pretel, Julen, 2012. "Job creation and job destruction in the presence of informal markets," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(2), pages 270-286.
    4. Edoardo Di Porto & Leandro Elia & Cristina Tealdi, 2013. "The "emersion" effect: an ex post and ex ante social program evaluation on labor tax evasion in Italy," Working Papers 2/2013, IMT Institute for Advanced Studies Lucca, revised Jun 2013.
    5. Steinar Holden & Åsa Rosén, 2014. "Discrimination And Employment Protection," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 12(6), pages 1676-1699, December.
    6. repec:oup:oxecpp:v:69:y:2017:i:1:p:143-164. is not listed on IDEAS
    7. MATSUURA Toshiyuki & SATO Hitoshi & WAKASUGI Ryuhei, 2011. "Temporary Workers, Permanent Workers, and International Trade: Evidence from Japanese firm-level data," Discussion papers 11030, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    8. repec:eee:labchp:v:3:y:1999:i:pc:p:2985-3028 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Afonso, Óscar, 2016. "Effects of labour-market institutions on employment, wages, R&D intensity and growth in 27 OECD countries: From theory to practice," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 48-62.
    10. Mislav Brkic, 2015. "Labor Market Duality and the Impact of Prolonged Recession on Employment in Croatia," Croatian Economic Survey, The Institute of Economics, Zagreb, vol. 17(1), pages 5-45, June.
    11. Blanchard, Olivier Jean, 1997. "Labor-market flexibility and aggregate employment volatility : A comment," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 229-239, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    dual labor markets; United States; Europe;

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mtp:titles:0262193760. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Kristin Waites). General contact details of provider: http://mitpress.mit.edu .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.