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Limited Asset Market Participation and the Elasticity of Intertemporal Substitution

  • Annette Vissing-Jorgensen
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    The paper presents empirical evidence based on the US Consumer Expenditure Survey that accounting for limited asset market participation is important for estimating the elasticity of intertemporal substitution (EIS). Differences in estimates of the EIS between assetholders and non-assetholders are large and statistically significant. This is the case whether estimating the EIS based on the Euler equation for stock index returns or the Euler equation for T-bills, in each case distinguishing between assetholders and non-assetholders as best possible. Estimates of the EIS are around 0.3-0.4 for stockholders and around 0.8-1 for bondholders, and are larger for households with larger asset holdings within these two groups.

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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w8896.pdf
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    Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 8896.

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    Date of creation: Apr 2002
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    Publication status: published as Vissing-Jorgensen, Annette. "Limited Asset Market Participation And The Elasticity Of Intertemporal Substitution," Journal of Political Economy, 2002, v110(4,Aug), 825-853.
    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:8896
    Note: EFG
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    1. Larry Jones & Rodolfo Manuelli & Henry Siu, 2000. "Growth and Business Cycles," NBER Working Papers 7633, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    8. Xavier Gabaix & David Laibson, 2002. "The 6D Bias and the Equity-Premium Puzzle," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2001, Volume 16, pages 257-330 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    14. Annette Vissing-Jorgensen, 2000. "Towards an Explanation of Household Portfolio Choice Heterogeneity: Nonfinancial Income and Participation Cost Structures," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 1102, Econometric Society.
    15. Attanasio, Orazio P & Weber, Guglielmo, 1993. "Consumption Growth, the Interest Rate and Aggregation," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(3), pages 631-49, July.
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